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Archive for June, 2021

What Can CourtScribes Do For You?

Posted on: June 28th, 2021 by joshw No Comments

microphone_in_court

CourtScribes is a team of highly professional court reporters based out of South Florida but has offices all over the country. CourtScribes is the leader of the industry using top-of-the-line technology for a fraction of the price. Having an experienced court reporter is essential to every case. This includes cases in federal, state, and local jurisdictions.

Did you know that digital recording is now the exclusive method used for the record for all Supreme Court cases? Well, CourtScribes has this covered as well with professional legal videography, ease of access databases, and transcripts that are made with effective and precise support services.

CourtScribes provides a service that paralegals and attorneys alike all rely on. Whether it’s a trial, deposition, arbitration, mediation, or a hearing, visit CourtScribes.com or call 1-833-SCRIBES today to inquire about services.

 

Our Top-of-the-Line Services Include:

Audio Recording

CourtScribes audio recording equipment is designed to record every voice clearly and precisely. Each sound channel is dedicated to another person. Without having interfering channels, each voice will be captured in its own time allowing for playback at any time. Regardless of outside noise, accents or low speaking voices, there should be zero issues with our court reporters’ abilities to capture every moment.

Audio Transcripts

Each sample of audio will be replayed, documented and time-stamped for future review if needed. There won’t be any issues if a previous statement needs to be retraced or disputed. These transcripts are available through our 24/7 online database.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recoding then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Videography

CourtScribes provides live and on-demand video streaming for your proceedings. These videos are also kept in our database for needed use. We use video-to-text synchronization for easy research into a past video. Using our time-recorded transcripts, you’ll be able to lookup statements from a perfect text record that matches up with both video and audio in perfection. Our top of the line technology will ensure that your case will be recorded with precision and accuracy.

 

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Project Steno Helps Students Choose a Career in Court Reporting

Posted on: June 21st, 2021 by joshw No Comments

Project Steno, founded in 2017, is an independent, non-affiliated organization that relies on financial support from the court reporting community to promote the stenographic reporting profession and recruit promising students.

Project Steno has a free, online, 12-hour course offering potential students an introduction to court reporting and captioning. All of this without having to make a financial commitment. Project Steno even provides a steno machine for the student’s use while in Basic Training.

The textbook and all training materials are provided to the prospects at no charge. Guest speakers will come to each two-hour session and explain the various professions to those who achieve the necessary stenographic skills.

The program allows prospective students to decide whether this is the right path for them. And with that, helping to save thousands of dollars in tuition and course fees should they discover it is not the right fit.

School data shows that 66% of students who start it, complete the 12-hour course, and 44% of those that complete enroll in court reporting school.

But it is a difficult course. It is very much like learning an instrument or a foreign language. This means that it can typically be a two-year program. Once enrolled, students are offered incentive-based merit awards (two at $1,000 each), as well as being mentored and encouraged along the journey to graduation and in their start as a new professional in our field.

Graduates are very necessary. As we have highlighted before, the industry is hurting for stenographers. Without graduates from this court reporting program, the community will be unable to staff courtrooms, putting at risk one’s right to appeal his/her/their verdict with a verbatim transcript of the testimony and arguments presented in trial.

Without graduates from the captioning programs, vital live events such as the news and sports will not be accessible to those members of our community who need them most: deaf and hard of hearing people.

If you need court reporting services (with a little more experience than Lumsden) that handle digital recoding then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

How Did COVID-19 Shape UK Court Reporting?

Posted on: June 14th, 2021 by joshw No Comments

Much like in the US, the UK justice system has also had to adapt to virtual settings (like Zoom meetings) throughout the pandemic. But it is not just lawyers and judges who have felt these perils. Court reporters have also experienced a period of adjustment.

When the pandemic hit, the UK government introduced The Coronavirus Act 2020. This meant that UK courts began to use video and audio technology so proceedings could be viewed by the public, including court reporters covering the cases.

And although the COVID-19 restrictions are easing, it doesn’t seem like video calls are going away anytime soon. The Coronavirus Act in the UK has been extended until September, so remote court hearings will continue until then.

Bumps in the Road

The transition to virtual court attendance has had its fair share of bumps in the road. One of the issues was that the UK legal system lacked the digital technology and infrastructure to make a smooth transition. Participants were dialing in through Skype and then a dedicated cloud video platform. Many times the links did not work and the settings were not acoustically designed for the type of set-up. It was often hard to hear who was talking and pick up the important details during hearings.

Normally the clerk of the court is on hand to clarify questions, or details on court lists, addresses, charges, or even the spelling of people’s names. But it is harder to ask questions in a virtual setting and so routine questions needed to be handled through follow-up emails. This was rather challenging.

Tuning in through a camera lens fails to encapsulate the typical drama expected in the courtroom. Journalists are missing out on reactions from the dock, defendants reacting to what’s being said about them, not being able to see the barristers or judge, and not understanding who the other people in the courtroom are. These are all peripheral things taken for granted in a courtroom.

 

The Upsides & Benefits

However, there is a bright side. Virtual hearings are more practical when a full day of work could mean up to four different hearings at four different venues across the town. So while the downside is that you can’t be there, you save time on travel and can get more accomplished virtually.

Improving accessibility could also see a spark of interest in court reporting. Virtual attendance has the capacity to get more journalists in the newsrooms involved with court reporting, but also spark more interest in the young talent coming through. However, universities have not been able to take their journalism students to visit courts as they normally would.

 

If you need court reporting services in the US that handles digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world is ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

What is a Stenotype, the Tool Stenographers Use

Posted on: June 7th, 2021 by joshw No Comments

stenographyWe have all seen that person in the courtroom typing away superfast on something that “kinda looks like a typewriter”. They are typing away because they are taking down all of the information to create a record of the events in that courtroom. And while that is not a typewriter they are typing on, it is actually called a stenotype. It is also known as a shorthand machine, steno writer, or chorded keyboard. And what that stenotype is doing, is recording in shorthand.

Those who are registered to use a stenotype as a trained court reporter must write speeds of approximately 180, 200, and 225 words per minute at very high accuracy in the categories of literary, jury charge, and testimony. We here at CourtScribes have many stenographers that are experts at just that.

 

What is a Stenotype?

The stenotype machine was invented in 1906 by Ward Stone Ireland, an American stenographer and court reporter. The stenograph and stenotype machine are used in offices to some extent. But they are mostly used for court reporting. Both machines have keyboards of 22 keys, and because the operator uses all their fingers and both thumbs, any number of keys can be struck simultaneously. And they will need to be.

The operator controls the keys by touch and is thus able to watch the speaker. The fingers of the left hand control the keys that print consonants occurring before vowels. The thumbs control the vowels, and the fingers of the right hand control the consonants that follow the vowels. There are not separate keys for each letter of the English alphabet. Abbreviations are used for some of the most frequent words, giving the operator the ability to write two or three words in one stroke.

Pressing the multiple keys simultaneously spells out whole syllables, words, and phrases with a single hand motion. Because the keyboard does not contain all the letters of the English alphabet, letter combinations are substituted for the missing letters.

If you need court services that handle digital recording that require those stenography skills, then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersburg, and Rockville.