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Posts Tagged ‘Stenograph’

Court Scribes Explains What Those Court Reporters Are Typing On

Posted on: January 3rd, 2022 by Sfl Media No Comments

stenographerWhat’s that thing court reporters are always typing on? This is a question that CourtScribes gets asked all the time.

Well, that thing is called a stenotype machine. It’s also used for captioning television broadcasts as well. The stenotype works a bit like a portable word processor. It has a 22-button keyboard in place of the standard “qwerty” setup. The way modern stenotypes are set up, they have two rows of consonants across the middle, underneath a long “number bar.” Set in front are four vowel keys: “A,” “O,” “E,” and “U.”

How Does a Stenotype Work?

Court stenographers can type entire words all at once by striking multiple keys at the same time. This is a special skill that they have acquired. The left hand spells out the beginning of a syllable, while the right hand spells out the end. All keys are pressed at the same time, and the machine produces a word jumble that’s incomprehensible to anyone who’s not trained in (stenotype) machine shorthand.

Stenographers spell out syllables phonetically. But there aren’t enough keys on each side of the keyboard to cover every sound. Certain combinations of adjacent keys correspond to the missing consonants.

At court-reporting school, you learn one of at least half a dozen machine shorthand “theories,” which teach different approaches and general rules. Any experienced stenographer will work out his or her own abbreviations, especially for words and phrases particular to a given job.

In the old days, everything a stenographer typed would print to a roll of narrow paper tape. Later on, the stenographer would translate the notes back to English, and sometimes another stenographer would check the translation. Now the translation is done by computer. Fancier stenotype machines translate as they go. The paper tape still records the original notes, but an LCD display on the machine itself shows the words in regular English.

Almost all stenographers have their own customized machines. A brand-new, top-of-the-line stenotype costs up to about $4,500. Cheaper training models are a bit over $1,000.

In the last few years, more court reporters have begun to use less expensive technologies. A “verbatim” reporter holds a tiny microphone up close to his mouth and repeats everything he hears behind a mask and device that silences the sound of his voice. Voice-recognition software can translate the recording into printed text either after the fact or as the recording is made.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersburg, and Rockville.

What is a Stenotype, the Tool Stenographers Use

Posted on: June 7th, 2021 by Sfl Media No Comments

stenographyWe have all seen that person in the courtroom typing away superfast on something that “kinda looks like a typewriter”. They are typing away because they are taking down all of the information to create a record of the events in that courtroom. And while that is not a typewriter they are typing on, it is actually called a stenotype. It is also known as a shorthand machine, steno writer, or chorded keyboard. And what that stenotype is doing, is recording in shorthand.

Those who are registered to use a stenotype as a trained court reporter must write speeds of approximately 180, 200, and 225 words per minute at very high accuracy in the categories of literary, jury charge, and testimony. We here at CourtScribes have many stenographers that are experts at just that.

 

What is a Stenotype?

The stenotype machine was invented in 1906 by Ward Stone Ireland, an American stenographer and court reporter. The stenograph and stenotype machine are used in offices to some extent. But they are mostly used for court reporting. Both machines have keyboards of 22 keys, and because the operator uses all their fingers and both thumbs, any number of keys can be struck simultaneously. And they will need to be.

The operator controls the keys by touch and is thus able to watch the speaker. The fingers of the left hand control the keys that print consonants occurring before vowels. The thumbs control the vowels, and the fingers of the right hand control the consonants that follow the vowels. There are not separate keys for each letter of the English alphabet. Abbreviations are used for some of the most frequent words, giving the operator the ability to write two or three words in one stroke.

Pressing the multiple keys simultaneously spells out whole syllables, words, and phrases with a single hand motion. Because the keyboard does not contain all the letters of the English alphabet, letter combinations are substituted for the missing letters.

If you need court services that handle digital recording that require those stenography skills, then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersburg, and Rockville.

The Importance of a Court Reporter

Posted on: August 10th, 2020 by Sfl Media No Comments

 

Technology has seen an increase of jobs being taken over by their mechanical counterparts. Some people believe that the court reporter may soon be one of the jobs that loses its value when this much technology is available. However, certain jobs, such as this one, requires a human quality to properly function.

The court reporter is the person in charge of making a verbatim legal record using a stenograph. Using this stenograph, they transcribe the court proceedings in shorthand. Instead of being replaced, the addition of audio technology allows a court reporter to now complete their job with even greater efficiency.

 

Efficiency and Reliability

 

When you’re looking at the reason for transferring to technology it usually comes down to whichever option is more efficient and reliable. So, we’ll have to go into a little detail about the necessity of the court reporter.

Audio technology has given people a way to record conversations in detailed manners. However, some things are unable to be recorded if there is a crossover in speech by multiple people. This means that there needs to be a human also recording everything being said in order to capture the full truth. Yes, technology has now given people a way to record, but this should mean that the occupation is now enhanced and requires training with audio recording technology on the side. This would be the most efficient and reliable way.

 

Can’t Take that Chance

 

Court reporters main focus is to record every single word that is uttered within the courtroom. All while differentiating between those who are speaking, and ignoring the background noises. One of the hardest situations is when two attorneys or legal participants speaking over each other. Audio technology has advanced to a much higher stage than its tape recorder predecessors. However, if there is any chance that this device may lose speech during a situation where two people are speaking over each other, then that entire passage of speech has been lost to case. This especially matters if there is an appeal to the case. In other words, until it is perfect, we can’t take that chance.