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Posts Tagged ‘digital reporting’

CourtScribes is the Choice For Professional Court Reporting

Posted on: August 9th, 2021 by Sfl Media No Comments

CourtScribes is a team of highly professional court reporters that has offices all over the country but is based out of South Florida. CourtScribes is the leader in the industry using top-of-the-line technology. Having an experienced court reporter is essential to every case. This includes cases in federal, state, and local jurisdictions.

You may not have known, but digital recording is now the exclusive method used for the record for all Supreme Court cases. Well, CourtScribes is doing the same with professional legal videography, ease of access databases, and transcripts that are made with effective and precise support services.

CourtScribes provides services that attorneys and paralegals alike all rely on. Whether it’s a trial, deposition, arbitration, mediation, or a hearing, visit CourtScribes.com or call 1-833-SCRIBES today to inquire about services.

 

Our Top-of-the-Line Services Include:

Audio Recording

CourtScribes audio recording equipment is designed to record every voice clearly and precisely. Each sound channel is dedicated to another person. Without having interfering channels, each voice will be captured in its own time allowing for playback at any time. Regardless of outside noise, accents or low speaking voices, there should be zero issues with our court reporters’ abilities to capture every moment.

Audio Transcripts

Each sample of audio will be replayed, documented and time-stamped for future review if needed. There won’t be any issues if a previous statement needs to be retraced or disputed. These transcripts are available through our 24/7 online database.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recoding then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Videography

CourtScribes provides live and on-demand video streaming for your proceedings. These videos are also kept in our database for needed use. We use video-to-text synchronization for easy research into a past video. Using our time-recorded transcripts, you’ll be able to lookup statements from a perfect text record that matches up with both video and audio in perfection. Our top of the line technology will ensure that your case will be recorded with precision and accuracy.

 

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Three Common Misconceptions About the National Court Reporter Shortage

Posted on: August 2nd, 2021 by Sfl Media No Comments

Recent studies were done that caught the eye of CourtScribes regarding a likely court reporter shortage. The study found that the gap between the number of available stenographers and the demand for their services nationwide continues to increase year over year. This is no surprise as we have reported on this many times.

This problem has been consistent for seven years now and the shortage is impossible to ignore. This is a reality that the COVID-19 pandemic couldn’t even mask.

No firm has been immune to the impact of this court reporter shortage, especially firms located in the most litigious states like California, New York, Illinois, Texas and Florida. However, there are plenty of misconceptions about the national court reporter shortage.

Interestingly enough, some believe that there is no shortage at all despite all the evidence. There are some misconceptions about what is going on in the industry.

Misconception #1: Can’t we just train more stenographers?

This is easier said than done, especially when statistical data proves that such a proposition is near impossible.

Why is this happening? It was found that 70% of stenographers were over the age of 46. As the current population of stenographers continues to progress towards retirement, there are not enough new stenographers from younger generations entering the field to help close the gap.

Misconception #2: The shortage won’t affect us.

While you might think that only the “big” litigation states will be impacted by this shortage, each state will face the devastating lack of court reporters sooner than later.

As of 2019, 82,000 new students enrolled in court reporting training programs nationwide each year to overcome the deficit. This dropped dramatically in 2019 where there were only about 2,500 new enrollments. Now imagine that the average graduation rate is 10% and you’re talking about a maximum of only 125 new court reporters into the market.

You can see how the shortage is affecting all of the states. Combine this with our new remote work environments brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and there are even fewer court reporters available.

 

Misconception #3: There are no alternatives to stenography to combat the shortage.

While stenography is the gold standard for capturing a verbatim record of a proceeding, there are other court reporting methodologies available that are both accurate and flexible and provide the same finished product.

Voice writing offers an alternative to stenographers. A voice writer speaks into a steno mask, capturing a verbatim record of the proceeding, while speech-recognition technology converts the recorded audio into text.

Digital reporting is another court reporting method that has gained more widespread adoption in recent years. In fact, courthouses and law firms across the US have been successfully using digital reporting for years as their sole means of recording hearings and trials.

As the supply of available court reporters continues to widen each year, it’s becoming increasingly more important for legal professionals to understand and recognize the potential implications for their practice. While stenography will always remain the gold standard, there are additional court reporting methodologies that offer accurate, affordable and flexible solutions.

If you need court reporting services (with a little more experience than Lumsden) that handle digital recoding then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Despite Tech Court Reporters Say They’re Here to Stay

Posted on: January 11th, 2021 by Sfl Media No Comments

stenographer

In the age of smartphones, it’s a common occurrence. Instead of typing out a text, you use Siri or Alexa and dictate your message. Sometimes your digital assistant gets it right, but sometimes (many times), she gets it wrong. This can create issues that are frustrating.

This misunderstood voice-to-text message might not be a big deal for day-to-day affairs. But in court, these words matter, and even one mistake in messaging can make or break a case.

It’s this reason that court reporters strongly dispute the notion that voice-to-text technology or other artificial intelligence could replace them in a courtroom. Even in the age of a pandemic that forced court proceedings into the digital world, reporters insist that a human element is needed to create an accurate record.

That being said, digital recording is growing, and it’s more than likely here to stay. But, according to some, there’s a middle ground to be found: embracing technology to increase efficiency while also relying on humans for nuance.

 

COVID-19 Changes

Once the pandemic came, it forced the entire legal industry, reporters included, into a virtual environment. That transition created new responsibilities for reporters.

Reporters have always had “officiating duties,” such as administering oaths to witnesses in court and depositions. But the move to virtual proceedings has created more nuance in that role. Attorneys took to Zoom quickly because of the convenience the platform provides.

 

The Human Element

There are two main reporting methods: traditional stenographic reporting and digital reporting. These methods play the same role but with different tools. The traditional method translates proceedings from stenography into English for a transcript, while the latter translates digital audio directly into a transcript.

Digital recording is useful from an efficiency perspective, though lawyers need to hire a stenographic reporter if they want the level of efficiency provided by real-time reporting. But there is a “misunderstanding” in the industry as to the role digital technology can play in producing a transcript.

Also is the issue of differing dialects. A non-native English speaker testifying in a medical malpractice case might pronounce the word “skeletal” as skee-lee-tal, and voice-to-text technology would capture the word in that manner. A reporter, however, would know that the witness meant “skeletal” and would transcribe accordingly.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.