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Posts Tagged ‘court reporters’

Why It’s Important for Court Reporters to Keep Their Equipment in Good Condition

Posted on: May 23rd, 2022 by Harrison Bryan No Comments

Court reporters are the unsung heroes of the courtroom. In the background of every court case, divorce, or legal battle, there is a court reporter working diligently in the background. A good court reporter is someone who can record statements that are made during court proceedings with perfect accuracy. While it’s important for court reporters to have a certain knowledge level to do their jobs effectively, the condition of the equipment they use is equally important.  

Here’s why it is important for court reporters to always keep their equipment updated and in good condition. You will also learn how the state of a court reporter’s equipment can affect the outcome of a court case. 

Court Reporter Equipment

Court reporters use several key pieces of equipment to do their jobs. Practically every court reporter uses a stenographer typewriter. These are specially designed typewriters that are built to facilitate fast and easy typing. It’s important for court reporters to keep their stenographer typewriters in good condition or to replace them when they become unreliable. 

Most court reporters also use microphones and voice recording equipment to capture audio during court proceedings or depositions. If the microphones or recording equipment is damaged in any way, it can affect the recordings which can affect the accuracy of the court reporter’s transcripts in turn. This is why it’s important for court reporters to keep their equipment in good condition. 

Need Court Reporters with Top-Notch Equipment? Call CourtScribes Today!

The team at CourtScribes uses top-notch equipment that’s always properly maintained. You can count on us for reliable court reporting every time because we take our responsibilities seriously. If you need court reporting services and you want the best for less, you’ll want to get in touch with CourtScribes.

Need court reporters that you can depend on? Call CourtScribes today!

Curious Facts About Court Reporters

Posted on: March 21st, 2022 by Harrison Bryan No Comments

Many people don’t really think about what it takes to be a court reporter until they either go into the industry themselves or need to rely on one during a deposition. Court reporters might work in the background, but the work they do helps legal professionals who are at the forefront of virtually every court case. Here are some curious facts about court reporters. 

They Have Specialized Equipment

One of the first things you should know about court reporters is how fast they can type. Most professional court reporters are expected to type at speeds of 180-220 words per minute. Now that’s fast!

You should also know that court reporters don’t type on traditional QWERTY keyboards. Instead, they use a specialized keyboard with 22 keys. The keyboard is divided into two halves, one for fingers on the right and one for the fingers on the left. This design helps court reporters type faster and more comfortably. 

They Save People the Trouble of Generating Settled Statements

Without a court reporter to record everything that has been said throughout a trial or deposition, legal teams would have to resort to generating settled statements. A settled statement is a term for a document representing oral court proceedings. 

While it’s ultimately approved by a trial court judge, both parties can contest the document multiple times which can cause court cases to drag on unnecessarily. This is one of many reasons why it’s so important to have a court reporter on hand.  

Want Records You Can Count On? Call CourtScribes

If you’re looking for a service that can produce perfect records that you can count on in court. Our team is expertly trained, friendly, and willing to help. When you work with us, you will have the confidence of knowing that the records you’re working with are accurate and precise.   

Looking for a dependable court reporter service? Get in touch with CourtSrcibes today!

What Happens When a Court Reporter Makes a Mistake

Posted on: March 14th, 2022 by Harrison Bryan No Comments

A good court reporter prides themself on their accuracy and eye for detail. Everyone makes mistakes, but in the court reporting industry, there simply isn’t any room for error. One simple mistake can throw an entire court case off course. Here’s what can happen when a court reporter makes a mistake and why you should partner with CourtScribes. 

How Bad Can it Be?

If you’re wondering how bad it can be when a court reporter makes a simple mistake, the answer is, pretty bad. One incident involving a court reporter who lost the record of the entire case due to a computer virus threw a murder trial completely off course. As a result, they had to hold a new trial because the court reporter had lost their records from the original trial.  

One court reporter compromised at least 30 cases after misrepresenting things that had been said throughout the trial as pure gibberish. The court reporter continuously typed gibberish in favor of the actual dialogue. Although they were subsequently fired, the damage they caused to each individual case was monumental. 

Accuracy is one of the things that people depend on court reporters for in the first place. One of the most important responsibilities of any court reporter is to ensure an accurate record of everything that has been said throughout the duration of the case. 

Want 100% Accuracy? Give CourtScribes a Call!

Now that you know how bad it can be when a court reporter makes a mistake, you know the importance of working with a court reporter who can ensure accuracy to the point of perfection. CourtScribes features an expertly trained team of world-class professionals who understand the importance of total accuracy. 

Need a court reporter for an upcoming case? Call CourtScribes today and put the best to the test!

Why Stenography is Necessary in Law

Posted on: October 18th, 2021 by Sfl Media No Comments

You probably already are well familiar from this site that court stenographers are people trained to type and write in shorthand, which allows them to write as fast as people can speak. It is believed that 180 Words Per Minute is the ‘speed of speech’. Stenographers document and record everything that takes place in the courtroom. This makes them an integral part of court hearings across the world. In this article, we are going to break down what stenography is, and explain why it is important in law.

 

What Does Stenography Mean?

The word ‘stenography’ comes from the Greek word ‘steno’ which means narrow and ‘graphy’ which means writing. ‘Narrow writing’ therefore, is the writing system of shorthand. Stenographer simply means shorthand writer. Modern-day stenographers use machines called stenotypes, which allow them to type, in some cases, faster than 300 WPM, which is just about double the ‘speed of speech’.

Stenography is a specialist career, still vital to the legal industry despite the massive changes and advancements made in technology. Attempts to phase out stenography have failed in many places around the world, which we will explain, so continue to read more here about it. But first, here is a brief history of stenography, some basic facts you should know about.

 

The Importance of Stenographers

It is a requirement in many places for courts to have written transcripts. This alone makes stenography something that is still needed. Court reporters sit in on courtrooms and transcribe as the case is heard. Many now use a technology called ‘steno masks’ which are microphones plugged into their computers that run voice-recognition software. The stenographer then, in real-time, cleans up the machine’s mistakes and errors; the perfect fusion of technology and stenography.

While technology is an incredibly important part of all of our lives, it cannot be entirely trusted just yet. Machines are not infallible and make mistakes. A stenographer must supervise and verify what these ‘steno masks’ record. Court reporters are now also tasked with writing down the defendant’s gestures and expressions, as well as their reactions to things. This is something that no machine can do (at the moment).

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

County in Indiana Makes Sure That Court Reporter’s Pay is Raised

Posted on: September 13th, 2021 by Sfl Media No Comments

We at CourtScribes always think that positive news regarding court reporters is always a good thing. With that, Lawrence County, Indiana judges asked that all their court reporters be placed on the same pay schedule during the most recent county council meeting

“All of the judges have agreed this is acceptable practice in dealing with helping to increase pay for their court reporters,” said Lawrence County President Scott Smith.

Lawrence County Superior Court I Judge John Plummer III’s budget was similar to his budget over the last three years with the only key difference of making a request for all court reporters to receive a six percent salary increase.

Judge Plummer III works with one less court reporter than the courts do, which is a savings of approximately $45,000 to the county. The average court reporter’s salary ranged from $35,000 – $43,000 in 2021, the proposed salary increase would lift the average salary between the amounts of $36,000 -$44,000.

There are several qualifications and requirements that are labor-intensive to find applicants who meet the expectations, training, and follow Indiana State law in performing the duties required. A court reporter types a real-time transcription of everything that happens in a court of law. When there are appeals of a criminal case a court reporter must be able to provide a transcript of the proceedings which takes a lot of time.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersburg, and Rockville.

CourtScribes Providing 24/7 Online Access to Your Private Online Repository

Posted on: March 1st, 2021 by joshw No Comments

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CourtScribes is the website and court service for all of your court reporter, remote court access, and online database needs. One of the top features offered is that CourtScribes offers 24/7 access to a private online repository that will hold all of your transcripts, exhibits, and videos regardless of where you might be located. By using either a computer, tablet, or smartphone, one can access all files on-demand. If you need the help of some of the most skilled court reporters in the business, then you must contact CourtScribes today!

 

What Type of Services does a Court Reporting Agency Provide?

CourtScribes takes pride in providing the most high-value skills many court reporting agencies don’t even possess. Here are some services that CourtScribes provides:

CourtScribes covers trials, arbitrations, depositions, mediations and hearings.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

2021 National Court Reporting & Captioning Week Announced for February

Posted on: December 28th, 2020 by joshw No Comments

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CourtScribes is proud to announce that The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), which is the country’s leading organization representing stenographic court reporters, captioners, and legal videographers, has designated February 6th-13th as the 2021 National Court Reporting & Captioning Week.

The weeklong event themed ‘All you need is love and steno.’ brings court reporters, captioners, court reporting firms, schools, and others in the legal industry together in showing the many aspects that make court reporting and captioning a viable profession.

Aspects include a quicker entrance into the workforce since no four-year degree is required, well-paying salaries, job and hours flexibility, and an increasing demand for more reporters and captioners to meet the growing number of employment opportunities available in the field.

The 2021 event marks the ninth year NCRA has hosted the celebration.

 

“Court Reporting & Captioning Week is our time to shine the light on what we do, why we do it, and what makes us, human court reporters and captioners, so vital,” said NCRA President Christine Phipps, RPR.

“Whether we are preserving records of proceedings, gathering the stories of our war veterans, or ensuring that the spoken word is made available through captions to members of the deaf or hard of hearing community, the skills we employ as professionals are dynamic and unique and cannot ever be replaced by artificial intelligence or electronic recordings,” Phipps added.

 

Court reporting and captioning professions offer serious career choices and plenty of employment opportunities nationwide and abroad. Court reporters and captioners rely on the latest in technology to use stenographic machines to capture the spoken word and translate it into written text in real-time. This work can take place both in and out of the courtroom. These tasks include recording legal cases & depositions, providing live captioning of events, and assisting members of the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities with gaining access to information, entertainment, educational opportunities, and more.

The NCRA made available a robust catalog of resources ranging from press release templates to media messages to help spread the word about the benefits of a career in court reporting or captioning. Additional marketing materials are available on NCRA’s DiscoverSteno.org site. There is also information available at the site about NCRA’s A to Z® Intro to Steno Machine Shorthand, a free, six-week program that offers attendees the opportunity to learn to write the alphabet on a steno machine to discover if a career in court reporting or captioning is suited for them.

If you need court reporting services that handle digital recording then CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

What is the Transcription Process of a Court Reporter?

Posted on: July 28th, 2020 by Santino No Comments

 

One of the most important aspects of our modern way of law is the court transcript. A court transcript is a word-for-word written document that displays the actions and statements said by every party within the court room. This all-important document must be made with perfection in order for an involved judge, attorney or any other legal participant to look back on the trial for information whenever they choose to do so. A court transcript is crafted by a court reporter, who sits in and records everything they hear.

 

Knowledge and Training Required to be a Court Reporter

 

Each different state has many different requirements and credentials in order to become a court reporter. Some states require college degrees. Whereas, other states need a certification and applicants need to possess and extensive knowledge of listening skills, writing skills, reading comprehension, concentration and attention to detail. Judges and attorneys require a perfect transcript to look back on cases. In other words, there is no room for error when recording the proceedings for a trial. The standard for typing speed for a court reporter would be about 225 words per minute.

Court reporters must learn a special type of shorthand. It is an abbreviated language form that is designed for rapid transcription, to take notes on a steno machine in order to catch each word that is spoken. Once the notes are entered into the machine, they are translated by computer software into English.

 

CourtScribes Supports Court Reporters from Around the Nation

 

CourtScribes.com supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we too are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

How Videography Has Rocketed Court Reporting into the Future

Posted on: July 14th, 2020 by Santino No Comments

 

 

Court Reporting is now an age-old industry that has brought an infinite amount of value into the courtroom. However, just as many other industries have developed technologies for betterment, court reporters have called upon legal videographers to aid them in the modern era. Videographers possess plenty of valuable skills that help a court reporter take the next step in completing their jobs. Videography has added an element of audio-freedom for the court reporter. Being able to sit in, or tune in, to a video streaming courtroom allows them to focus in on all the sounds, comments and statements made by all legal participants within the trial.

 

What Actually Changes for the Court Reporter?

 

You may ask yourself, “Doesn’t the legal videographer make the court reporter unnecessary?” The answer is no. Regardless how far into the future we may proceed, a third-party person must be there to record all statements made throughout the trial. It must be an unbiased and professional person to examine, transcribe and formulate correct and precise recordings. However, the addition of videography to the industry, has allowed for a whole new experience within the court reporting industry. Recorded video and audio allow for not only a video sit-in for transcription, but also material for them to cross-examine and document. These transcripts are now able to be timestamped with perfection on not only text, but audio recording and video recording.

 

It is Essential to Have a Team of Experienced Legal Videographers and Court Reporters

 

In order to succeed within this modern era of technology, you will require a team of professionals that can handle all of the aspects of recording within a courtroom. CourtScribes is proud to offer attorneys, judges and other legal participants all of the features of a modern courtroom. Our team is compiled of not only court reporters, but leading-edge technology that will ensure every step of the way is taken care of. Professional videography, video-to-text synchronization, live streaming and online databases are just a small sample of what CourtScribes has to offer.

NCRA’s Celebrate Certification Month

Posted on: May 18th, 2020 by Santino No Comments

 

The Members of the National Court Reporter’s Association are once again coming to participate in the annual Celebrate Certification Month. This May will be the third year of celebrating not only Court Reporter certifications, but certifications of all kind. Throughout the month, members of the NCRA are being encouraged to share with clients and other workforce about their success with being a certified court reporter. Also, they are trying to connect with clients about how important receiving a national certification is, and how important it is to choose people who possess such qualities.

 

Importance of Having a National Certification

 

National certifications are a key element to showing dedication to your profession. A national certified court reporter has a big commitment to their profession and does their best to keep all of their skills polished. Those with professional certifications provide the highest quality service available in the career. Also, numerous court reporters that truly do possess their professional certifications show to have a higher pay then others. Court Reporters are currently in short supply. All over the country, these positions need to be filled. What better time to strive for a certification in professional court reporting than now?

 

Court Reporter Platform

 

Court reporters all over the country are striving for greatness in their profession. There are tons of specialized court reporting certifications. Many of these professions only require designated training and certifications. This is contrary to other professions that require well over 4 years of learning in a scholastic environment. Being a court reporter is in increasing demand. These jobs include venues all over the world, flexible schedules and great salaries! May, 2020 is another year of celebrating certifications of all kinds throughout the country. If you haven’t taken the time to achieve a professional certification for your job, then now is the time! It is never too late to be recognized as one that strives and perseveres in their profession!

Virtual Court During Pandemic

Posted on: April 27th, 2020 by Santino No Comments

 

With the coronavirus effecting the nation, people have been social distancing for all types of events. All court dates were delayed without further notice once the lockdown began. However, this week was a new look for court. The court system began its virtual court in order to start knocking out many of the waiting appeals. This system will allow cases to be slowly undertaken while remaining a safe distance away. Until the lockdown ends, this system is necessary. However, there is no site as to when exactly that will happen. According to President Trump, he intends to reopen the country this coming month.

 

COVID-19 Pandemic Court Response

 

People that are currently in essential or emergency proceedings that need to appear in court no longer have to wait until the end of the pandemic. This not only allows court officials to continue along schedule, but dramatically reduces the amount of people within the courtroom. Participants are able to use Skype to connect to the court proceeding and further the process at an expedited rate. Judges, criminal defendants, attorneys and more are all able to continue their social distancing while taking care of the cases that need immediate attention. This process also makes certain participants even more essential. Such as Court Reporters!

 

Court Reporters Document Your Virtual Case

 

When you are part of a proceeding that needs someone to have an ear open and everything to be documented, a court reporter is there to help. During these virtual cases, many things can be mistranslated or miscommunicated due to the video conferences. A court reporter is extremely necessary in order to document your full case. These court reporters are willing to put their work ahead of them and aid during this critical time. Constant monitoring of social distancing is still occurring. Therefore, in order for your case to be documented correctly, be sure to have a court reporter present during the virtual case!

Free Legal Video When You Use CourtScribes

Posted on: March 16th, 2020 by Sfl Media No Comments

CourtScribes court reporting agency delivers both a complete range of standard court reporting services as well as advanced, high-value services not available from other court reporting services. In addition to the certified transcript, CourtScribes provides live & on-demand video streaming of trial proceedings for enhanced trial team support. CourtScribes is proud to covers trials, depositions, arbitrations, mediations, and hearings for our clients.

Does your court reporting agency give you a free video?

At CourtScribes court reporting agency we provide all our clients with a free legal video! Here is a little more information about the amazing services we provide here at CourtScribes court reporting agency. At CourtScribes we offer two different packages for our court reporting service:

Standard Services

Advanced Services

If you would like to use CourtScribes for your court reporting needs and get a free legal video for every case. Then we would love the opportunity to earn your business and build a long-standing relationship. CourtScribes proudly serves the following areas:

Jacksonville

Miami

Tampa

Port St. Lucie

Fort Lauderdale

Cape Coral

Coral Springs

Clearwater

Palm Bay

Ft. Myers

Weston

Sarasota

Orlando

St. Petersburg

Hialeah

Stuart

Hollywood

Naples

West Palm Beach

Boca Raton

Deerfield Beach

Jupiter

Key West

Coral Gables

Maryland

Manhattan

Buffalo

Washington DC

Baltimore

Bowie

Virginia

Frederick

Albany

New York

Brooklyn

Westchester

Gaithersberg

Rockville

NY State Senator Addabbo Honors Forest Hills Court Reporting Program

Posted on: March 2nd, 2020 by Sfl Media No Comments

We at CourtScribes.com are always proud to see the profession being honored. It doesn’t happen enough, so it always great to see when it does. In this case, New York State Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr., visited Plaza College in Forest Hills, Queens to celebrate the institution’s renowned court reporting program.

As we have discussed countless times, there is a serious nationwide shortage of court reporters. It is a problem that will only become worse with impending retirements, as court reporters are on average 53 years old.

State Senator Addabbo presented Plaza College with a proclamation to commend its dedication to educating young men and women with the most efficient technology in RealTime writing, providing them with the skill to become professional court reporters.

During his visit to Plaza College, Senator Addabbo discussed his appreciation for the industry and the individuals who create an accurate record of the official spoken word.

 

“Court reporting and captioning is a vital skill that helps keep an accurate account of what takes place in courtrooms, and even in the State Legislature, as well as informing the deaf and hard-of-hearing with the necessary information they need,” said State Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr. “It was a privilege to honor Plaza College with a proclamation recognizing their wonderful Court Reporting and Captioning program during National Court Reporting and Captioning Week, and the hard-working students who help make that program a success. I truly appreciate Plaza College’s commitment to the quality, diverse educational programs it offers.”

Plaza College, the only school in New York City that offers a degree program in court reporting, has successfully introduced stenography to the next generation by educating high school students and others interested in the career field about the many opportunities available.

In partnership with the National Court Reporters Association, Plaza College offers students a free four-week introductory program to Steno Machine Shorthand called A to Z.

Plaza College President, Charles Callahan III noted how this is a proud moment for the school. Stating how they are endlessly dedicated to preparing court reporting students to be skilled professionals. Being recognized by Senator Addabbo is a great honor and helps in continuing to help the court reporting industry flourish into the future.

If you need court reporting services from the best court reporting service, CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Texas is Another State Hit With Court Reporter Shortages

Posted on: February 3rd, 2020 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

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As you know from reading the blogs on this site, the country is rapidly running low on court reporters. You can now add Texas to the list of states that is really beginning to feel the crunch,

On Dec. 31, Judge Chris Day, of the 2nd Judicial District Court, in Cherokee County, Texas, sent a formal request to Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton inquiring about the possibility of implementing a court recording system in face of “an increased shortage of court reporters.”

 

Shocking Statistics

In 2014, there were about 32,000 court reporters in the U.S. Texas had the second-biggest shortage in the country. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says the country has half that many court reporters today!

The good news is that becoming a court reporter only requires one to have a high school diploma or equivalent, and pass a state certification exam as well as a state and federal background check. Include court reporting school and a stenograph and it should only set one back $25,000.

Many students fail their certification tests on their third or fourth try as the program dwindled but in the last three years there has been a change in enrollment, a new spark in the profession, and the word is getting out that the legal profession needs court reporters, badly.

And the shortage has one major side effect that may have been overlooked: Court reporters make bank. In 2014, a six-figure court reporter job opened up in San Francisco, and while that’s still on the high end, median wages were approaching $60,000 a year in 2018.

 

What About Court Recorders

Isn’t the issue as simple as putting microphones on judges, prosecutors and plaintiffs? Well, not really.

Not only would the cost of implementing a recording system, as well as hiring human technicians to maintain and operate the equipment, likely reach as high as $400,000 after also factoring in storage and archiving costs, but court recorders are far less accurate. And there lies the biggest problem.

Court recording machines do not seem to be the answer. They have been tried and they are very difficult to transcribe with accuracy. They may be OK for municipal court but they are always extremely difficult and time-consuming.

Anyone who has ever struggled to understand a teacher with a thick accent or a police officer with a particularly distinct regional dialect can probably understand why simply recording someone’s voice might not be adequate for creating an accurate transcription.

So if you’re sick of your job or just ready for a career change and you live in Texas, now is the time. You should really think about becoming a court reporter. Because without court reporters to produce an accurate record of court proceedings, then chaos, injustice, and most gruesome court delays are likely to be the inevitable outcome. And nobody wants any of that.

If you need court reporting services from the best court reporting service, CourtScribes.com which supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Court Reporter Shortage Could Affect Trials in Texas

Posted on: January 20th, 2020 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

texas-flagAnother state, another shortage in court reporting being mentioned on this site. This time out of Texas. All across Texas, a shortage of court reporters has caused a Cherokee County judge, Chris Day, to pitch an idea to the Texas attorney general.

His idea is to have an electronic recorder in-lieu of an appointed court reporter if said court reporter is unavailable. This worries Smith County official court reporter, Kristy Crawford.

 

“If you have electronic reporting then you have an uncertified person pressing record on the tape recorder,” she said.

 

Currently Judge Day is three months without a court reporter and says that the goal of the recorder is not to replace a court reporter, but to have an alternative in case they’re unavailable.

Court reporters are sworn officers of the court and their role is to protect the integrity of the record. If any mistakes are made in an electronic recorder, 321st District Court Judge Robert Wilson says it’ll cost the county.

 

“You’ve already lost an important part of the record. The authenticity is questioned and what that creates fertile ground for an appeal. Which ends up costing a county lots of money or resources to retry a case,” he said.

 

According to the National Court Reporters Association, the average age of a court reporter is 53 years old. And many court reporters are now retiring and local schools are not offering classes to train their replacements. This is due to a lack of interest by younger society.

In the state a lot of people have retired and then there’s also the schooling situation. Schools have closed that provide court reporting programs, Cherokee County official Court Reporter Tena Argenbright said.

Some court reporters believe that going electronic is a step in the wrong direction.

“There’s been a problem with the audio recording. Either it wasn’t three or someone forgot to hit record after a recess…those things happen because there’s not someone with their license on the line charged with making that record,” Crawford said.

CourtScribes.com supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we too are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

 

Wisconsin Courthouses Receive New Recording Systems Due to Shortage of Court Reporters

Posted on: December 30th, 2019 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

columbia-county-courthouseColumbia County, Wisconsin is on the shortlist to receive updated and new audio and video recording equipment for their courtrooms. This to fill in gaps as a statewide shortage of court reporters shows no signs of slowing.

Circuit Court Judge Andrew Voigt said the state is working to place new video and audio recording systems in almost all courtrooms across the state within the next two to three years, to provide uniformity in systems. The recording systems will also be used to address the rising shortage of court reporters, as a large number are set to retire, with very few new reporters entering the field to replace them.

(Yes, this is the same story we keep hearing all over the country.)

 

“There is a very significant percentage of court reporters in the state of Wisconsin eligible to retire in the next five years, dramatically more than are graduating from court reporting schools in Wisconsin,” said Voigt. “There is no conceivable way that the graduates could fill all of what will be open spaces.”

 

The state will provide the equipment and technology. But because the county owns the courthouse, it will be responsible for wiring or rewiring the courtrooms for installation. The state will be responsible for storing the files that are recorded in courtrooms and making them available.

Voigt said these systems will likely not be extensively used in the near future as there is still enough court reporters working in the county.

“This is a response to (an expected shortage of court reporters) because we as a court system don’t ever want to be in a position where we can’t hold court because we are missing personnel,” he said.

 

Will Technology Replace Court Reporters

While this is all meant to fill gaps in the absence of a court reporter, it will not eliminate the need for someone to operate the computer system used to record, and create transcripts from the recordings nor will it eliminate all court reporter positions throughout the state.

The county was not aware of the costs of this system. The money needed to wire the courtrooms is not accounted for in the 2020 budget, but is needed by the time the state is ready to install the equipment which Voigt says will likely be late February or early March.

“There’s so many unknowns with this, but we don’t have a choice, by statute they can order us to do this,” said County Board Chairman Vern Gove. “We don’t know what this is going to be, but it could be a big amount.”

CourtScribes.com supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we too are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Alfred State College Helping Court Reporting Students Via Project Steno

Posted on: December 23rd, 2019 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

project-steno-logoAlfred State College, of New York, is partnering with Project Steno to help put students on a path to a rewarding career in the high-demand field of court reporting.

Project Steno promotes the stenographic court reporting/captioning profession through social media and community outreach, with the goal of building a robust pipeline of students into school and graduating them in two years.

 

How Does Project Steno Help

The first step of Project Steno involves providing prospective students with a free introductory court reporting course, with partnering instructors donating their time and court reporters donating steno machines. After a six-week course, students are able to select a partnering school to attend so that they can obtain their court reporting degrees.

Students that complete the introductory course who then attend a partnering school will receive tuition assistance. As the final step in the process, Project Steno monitors student progress and helps mentor those who need extra help in order to ensure that those who meet the program milestones graduate in two years.

Alfred State offers a two-year degree in court and realtime reporting and a certificate in court reporting and captioning. To find out more about these programs, visit www.alfredstate.edu/court-reporting.

For more information on Project Steno, visit ProjectSteno.org.

CourtScribes.com supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we too are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Bloomfield College in New Jersey Starting Court Reporting Program

Posted on: December 16th, 2019 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

Bloomfield College will soon be the only institution in the state of New Jersey to offer on-site court reporting instruction. They will be offering two certificate programs starting in January 2020.  These programs will prepare students for careers in scoping (certificate one), and judicial court reporting/captioning (certificate two).

The Director of the program is Dr. Greg Reid (also the Library Director) and he knows the court reporting program is in high demand for both legal proceedings and for video captioning.

The National Court Reporters Association cites that there are 5,500 job vacancies due to a lack of qualified applicants and an aging workforce. More than 60% of people working as court reporters and captioners are making at least $60,000 annually, with salaries expected to increase by 14% through 2020.

Court reporting, and related professions, deal with converting the spoken word into standard, readable copy that can be searched and archived. Initial spoken word capture is done by a human, cryptically, via “machine shorthand.” The tool utilized for capture is a small “steno” machine with a specialized keyboard that interfaces, via software, with a standard computer/laptop.

For those interested in the court reporting program you can go to https://bloomfield.edu/academics/certificate-programs/court-reporting

CourtScribes.com supports all states and programs that aid in the court reporting world, and we too are ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

 

The National Court Reporters Association Annual Expo in Denver

Posted on: August 26th, 2019 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

NCRA_convention29 men and women filled the Colorado Convention Center in downtown Denver representing the cream of the court reporting crop. They descended on the Mile High City for the annual National Court Reporters Association Convention and Expo, where contestants are competing for the chance to be crowned the fastest and most accurate reporters and captioners in the country.

 

This is basically the Olympics of court reporting.

 

Who are the Participants?

Most know court reporters from movies or TV shows as the silent, robotic human that sits at a steno machine without so much as a smile or smirk and types away indiscriminately.

“People think we’re robots,” said court reporter Amanda Maze, “We’re not!”

And while the name of the role suggests court duties only, the profession extends far beyond depositions and preliminary hearings. Music festivals, TV, movies and more need closed captioning for performances. Sports broadcasts need someone to keep up with the announcers for its telecasts.

And guess what…none of it requires a college degree.

 

“People have no idea what a great job it is,” says a court reporter from Illinois and contest chair for the competition. “You can travel. You can have a great government job. You can stay home. There are so many possibilities.”

 

What do the Contestants Have to Say?

Court reporting is not typing, contrary to popular belief. It’s really learning a language.

Stenography machines look like laptops with smaller screens. They feature keyboards with long, piano-like keys without any letters of numbers. To keep up with the speed of human speech, reporters write in their own shorthand, combining different keys to produce words and phrases. They can also program keys to write common words that can be used with just one keystroke.

While these skills are mostly used in courtrooms and in boardrooms, veteran court reporters and captioners relish the ability to compete against one another on steno’s biggest stage: the National Speed and Realtime competitions.

Court reporters are usually grammar buffs and detail nuts with unnerving concentration. The best of them just let their fingers fly, a rhythm so familiar it’s like breathing or blinking.

“If you’re thinking,” Maze said, “you’ve already lost.”

 

The Competition 

In the speed contest, the contestants raced to complete three, five-minute sessions, that gradually escalate in speed and difficulty. Afterward, they’re allowed to clean up their transcriptions, and the person with the most accurate account takes home the gold.

And it’s all done in complete silence. Organizers gathered all cellphones and watches to prevent any distractions. One court reporter made sure that everyone had their Wi-Fi turned off.

Participants kept their stenos on black tripods, hoisted up to their waists. The computer voice launched into the third and final test, a rapid-fire sequence of questions and answers from a lawyer to a DNA expert. The speed: 280 words per minute.

The good news is that steno keys are virtually silent, unlike computer keyboards.

Many of the participants said the tight-knit court reporter community is what brought them to Denver. It wasn’t just about winning a medal. They come together as a fraternity that from our previous posts are “the last of a dying breed”.

CourtScribes.com is ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Are Court Stenographers on Their Way Out

Posted on: July 15th, 2019 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

As technology continues to improve daily, and it does continue rapidly to do so, there has been a concern regarding how much its advancement may cost people their jobs in the future. Now, we have entered an era where not only basic audio recordings, but also voice-to-text translations have become widely available, officials have started to wonder, “Are court reporters still needed in the courtroom…are stenographers on their way out?

And while the idea may strike fear to many, it’s not something that can be ignored. It’s an important discussion. The same way the steam engine has completely revolutionized the way people travel. Similar questions have been raised, like whether e-books will replace printed materials. As new technologies are adopted, is there a need to be worried about the livelihoods of people such as court reporters?

Some States are Changing

This shift has been happening a lot in recent years. Massachusetts, among other states, have actually discontinued the employment of official court reporters in the Supreme Court since June 30, 2018. Instead, a court monitor or a freelance court reporter oversees an electronic recording. This change is a clear indication of the move towards human-less interaction.

Presence of Transcript Errors

There have been incidents of transcript errors found on electronic proceedings, and investigations have been conducted in order to pinpoint the cause. Among the errors, they include machines suddenly turning off during proceedings (which cause missed testimonies), incomplete testimonies, and large portions of proceedings not being captured properly.

This being said, it’s clear how machines can be unreliable during important moments. All the more important, when it is in the case of a recording a court proceeding. But, it’s not only about technical difficulties. Machines, unlike humans, are incapable of politely interrupting in order to clarify misunderstood or misspoken words. A stenographer aka court reporter can do so. That is a major difference. It’s difficult to predict how much the technology will improve over the years. But, it’s apparent that current technology is still very limited, and factors such as background noise, low audio, or unclear speech may cause inconsistencies in the court transcripts.

So What is the Future

Human intervention is a highly important aspect of effective court reporting. This is one thing that the courts can’t do without in order to come up with accurate transcriptions. A court reporter has a huge contribution to the overall quality of work, and they’re not only responsible for actions inside the courtroom. Other tasks include preparing transcripts, making sure the printed transcripts are accurate, arranging the schedules of trials and other court proceedings, filing completed court transcripts with the county clerk, and even performing clerk duties such as the maintenance of law libraries, among others.

So, are court reporters on their way out? While there have been significant changes in the current court setup, court reporters are far from being “phased out.” At least to this point. But the tides are turning and technology is not going away. The technology at present, while useful, is still widely unreliable, and inaccuracies can be detrimental to any court proceeding. However, it’s still interesting to witness how much the industry is changing and progressing.

CourtScribes.com is ready to serve you in your court reporting, videography services, interpreters, live-streaming, and video-to-text synchronization.

Although the majority of cities that offer CourtScribes’ services are in Florida, the company home base, other cities all across these United States that CourtScribes offers services in, are the following: Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Port St. Lucie, Fort Lauderdale, Cape Coral, Coral Springs, Clearwater, Palm Bay, Fort Myers, Weston, Sarasota, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Hialeah, Stuart, Hollywood, Naples, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Deerfield Beach, Jupiter, Key West, Coral Gables, Maryland, Manhattan, Buffalo, Washington DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Virginia, Frederick, Albany, New York, Brooklyn,  Westchester, Gaithersberg, and Rockville.

Four Reasons To Hire A Skilled Court Reporting Service

Posted on: November 19th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

Professional court reporting services like Court Scribes are an important part of any trial, a fact that attorneys recognize.

Conservative Daily News recently listed several benefits of hiring a skilled court reporting service:

Expertise

Court reporters have to complete training that gives them the necessary knowledge and skills they need to provide their services in a courtroom. Most professional court reporters complete a two-year training course.

Miami court reporters

Experienced court reporters and stenographers have a good famliarity with legal documents, legal terms, and how court cases progress. They also are comfortable dealing with interruptions, delays, and background noise that are often associated with most depositions.

Peace of mind

Hiring a reliable court reporting agency will help the lawyer run the case smoothly, eliminating stress and headaches. A skilled court reporting agency will  handle all logistics and any last-minute.

Court reporters have a strong understanding of the importance of confidentiality and with the concept of neutrality. They understand they must always behave as an unbiased third party.

Prompt services

Agencies like Court Scribes that offer professional court reporting services, deposition services, and transcription have experience dealing with the needs of different attorneys and services are very efficient and reliable.

High level of accuracy

Court reporting services like Court Scribes have the background and experience to produce high-quality, accurate transcripts thanks to the cutting-edge technology they use and the quality people they employ.

CourtScribes uses professional-level recording systems to bring the most sophisticated digital technology into the private marketplace and provide the highest quality transcripts.

The company uses computer-based digital systems with enhanced features that perform recording functions with convenience, flexibility, and economy.

Electronic recording equipment is overseen by an experienced reporter at all times. The reporter simultaneously takes notes that are time-linked to the corresponding recording, so people involved with the case can instantly find the point in the record where they want to re-listen.

Courtroom Recording Technology Offers Distinct Advantages

Posted on: November 12th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

Advanced technology helps make trials easier in many ways. Christianity Today recently listed some of the benefits of court technology, the most important being that people who can’t attend the trial can view the transcript in real-time if they have an internet connection.

Here are some other advantages to having courtroom recording technology, per Christianity Today:

Immediate admission to the transcript

Attorneys can see the transcript while the trial is still going on, enabling them to quickly change their tactics if need be and strategize how to best question a witness. It also enables them to see clearly what was asked and answered earlier in the trial so they can re-state information if they need clarification.

Private messaging off the record

Attorneys can record off-the-record conversations via real-time instant messaging, saving time and averting any interruptions that might delay of the trial.

Live review

Real-time reporting allows the counsel’s teammates to see the  transcript instantly and formulate follow-up questions. They can also rephrase their queries if they did not get the response from the witness that they were looking for.

Cost efficiency

Attorneys can see a rough draft of the transcript before the final and official, making it much easier for them to prepare for the next day of questioning, which is cost-efficient for both the client and the attorney.

Testimonies can get impeached instantly

An instant transcript helps an attorney in the courtroom to impeach a witness instantly if necessary.

CourtScribes uses professional-level recording systems to bring the most sophisticated digital technology into the private marketplace and provide the highest quality transcripts.

The company uses computer-based digital systems with enhanced features that perform recording functions with convenience, flexibility, and economy.

Electronic recording equipment is overseen by an experienced reporter at all times. The reporter simultaneously takes notes that are time-linked to the corresponding recording, so people involved with the case can instantly find the point in the record where they want to re-listen.

Head Of Court Reporters Philanthropic Organization To Retire

Posted on: November 5th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), the country’s leading organization representing stenographic court reporters, captioners, and legal videographers, announced that the head of its philanthropic arm will retire in January.

BJ Shorak, Deputy Executive Director of the National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF), will be replaced by NCRA Senior Director of External Affairs Mary Petto.

“Today’s announcement does not mark the end of an era for NCRA and NCRF, but rather a step into the future for both organizations as they continue to work together to advance the court reporting and captioning professions,” said Marcia Ferranto, CEO and Executive Director of NCRA.

“BJ has committed the last 28 years of her career to building lasting relationships between NCRF and like-minded organizations, establishing unprecedented programs that benefit our members, students, and the legal profession as a whole and creating a legacy on which the Foundation will continue to grow,” she added.

Petto, who has been with NCRA for a year, most recently established NCRA’s Corporate Partnership Program to strengthen the Association’s mission to promote and protect the court reporting and captioning professions.

“I’ve had the privilege to work closely with Mary over the past year on a variety of fundraising activities for NCRF and am confident that her experience and fundraising talents will carry NCRF on its strategic path well into the future,” Shorak said.” I am confident that NCRF’s presence in the industry will remain strong and viable with the leadership of Mary and Marcia, who also has extensive experience in the fundraising arena.”

Shorak joined NCRA in 1987 as Director of Research and Technology. She was named Deputy Executive Director of the Foundation in 1992 when it began operating separately from NCRA.

Throughout her tenure, Shorak has successfully built lasting relationships with organizations and individuals that have led to dozens of meaningful programs

“I know I speak for hundreds of others whose lives BJ has touched through her work with the Foundation, that as she begins this new journey in her life, we will always be grateful for her commitment that has created the legacy she leaves behind: making a difference in the court reporting and captioning professions, and a smile in our hearts and on our faces whenever we think of her,” said NCRA Past President Tami Keenan.

Canada’s Legalization Of Marijuana Will Have Implications Across The Border

Posted on: October 29th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

On Oct.17, Canada became the second country in the world to legalize marijuana. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t any rules or laws that apply to marijuana smokers, The Washington Post reported.

Canadian law allows people 18 and older to buy marijuana, but some provinces have set a minimum age of 19 to match the drinking age, and Quebec has announced its intentions to raise it to 21.

The new federal law sets a 30-gram limit on how much marijuana people can buy or possess in public. That’s equivalent to about one ounce. In addition, some cities have specific rules that apply to where you can consume your legal lmarijuana.

The legal sale of pot is limited to fresh buds, oil, plants and seeds. Edibles are not available for legal purchase although you can cook and consume them in someone’s home.

Driving under the influence of drugs is illegal, with different penalties in different provinces.

You cannot bring marijuana legally purchased in Canada back into the United States, even if you are bringing it into a U.S. state where marijuana has been legalized. It will be considered both possession and drug smuggling.

Although medical cannabis is legal in 46 states, marijuana is still an illegal substance under federal law. The federal government regulates drugs through the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This act does distinguish between medical and recreational use of cannabis. Marijuana laws are used to prosecute people who possess, cultivate, or distribute large quantities of cannabis, according to Americans for Safe Access.

Under federal law, cannabis is treated like every other controlled substance, such as cocaine and heroin.. Under the CSA, cannabis is classified as a Schedule I drug, which means the federal government considers it to be highly addictive and that it has no medical value.

Although doctors can’t “prescribe” cannabis for medical use under federal law, they can “recommend” its use under the First Amendment, ASA said.

Indiana Supreme Court shifts in big way to electronic filing

Posted on: October 1st, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

High-tech solutions like the court reporting technology CourtScribes provides make the courtroom run more smoothly. And there are other important technological advances coming to courtrooms as well. One of them that increases efficiency and saves time and money is electronic filing.

For example, the Indiana Supreme Court is turning to electronic filing to reduce the paperwork that was created by the 1.3 million cases filed in Indiana’s state courts in the past year, The Statehouse File of Franklin College reported.

Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Loretta Rush said in the court’s 2017-2018 annual report that the goal is to switch almost every county court system to electronic filing over the next year.

Part of the problem is that more than a million cases being filed each year, courts are running out of room to file and store the paperwork, and electronic filing will create a more efficient, more accessible system while saving the court system money.

The electronic document filing system, along with new notification systems, will also help create more transparency among the courts and the public, Rush said. The court system also recently started sending reminder messages to defendants via text reminding them of important appointments like court dates.

Counties in the system have sent more than 160,000 text reminders in the past month alone.

“There was a real push with the courts with regards to advancing technology. We had about 90 percent of our counties involved in electronic filing in some form and we had 80 percent of our counties in a unified case management system,” Rush told The Statehouse File.

The court system has also increased security measures to make sure that the electronic records are fully protected, including putting the  entire system is behind the state’s technology firewall,

“We have a team in court administration for technology working on cyber security,” Rush said.

Technical College Plans To Add Court Reporting Curriculum

Posted on: September 24th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

There’s a nationwide shortage of court reporters, and while technology like the systems provided by CourtScribes help, skilled people are still needed to help with courtroom communications.

Horry Georgetown Technical College is one school that wants to start offering a court reporter program to help ease the shortage, which is especially severe in South Carolina, TV station WPDE ABC15 reported.

Horry Georgetown Technical College is a two-year technical college with three campuses, one in Georgetown, South Carolina, one in Conway, and one in Myrtle Beach. It is a part of the South Carolina Technical College System and is the fourth-largest technical college in the state, offering more than 80 degree and certificate programs.

Miami court reporters

The Miami court reporters of CourtScribes incorporate technology into their work.

The president of the college, Dr. Marilyn Fore, said the first step to setting up a program at the school is to figure out what credentials are needed for the job and to determine whether the program should be a degree program or certificate program.

Next, the college will build a curriculum then find qualified instructors to teach the classes.

“I think there are private contractors that teach court reporting but they would like for a college to do this, so they’re also volunteering to teach. I’m going to seek those folks out and see how they can help us to structure the program,” she said.

Fore said she hopes to have a plan in place by January.

A recent National Court Reporters Association found there will be 5,500 job openings available in the court reporting field across the country in the next five years.

Part of the reason for the strong demand is that many court reporters are retiring, so jobs are opening up, but there aren’t enough studying court reporting so there aren’t enough people to fill the jobs.

Also, a lack of awareness about the profession means people don’t often think of it as a career choice, something that court reporting programs are working locally and nationally to change.

New York Adds Watchdog Organization For Prosecutors

Posted on: September 17th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

Accurate court reporting is an important part of the criminal justice system, and so is fairness in prosecution.

New York state is working to reform its court system, and as part of that effort, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has signed legislation establishing the nation’s first State Commission on Prosecutorial Conduct.

The Commission will review and investigate prosecutorial conduct to address allegations of misconduct which lead to malicious prosecutions and wrongful convictions, frequently impacting people of color and marginalized communities.

By avoiding wrongful convictions and associated retrial costs and settlements, the Commission will save taxpayers money, the state said in a statement.

“Our criminal justice system must fairly convict the guilty and exonerate the innocent,” Governor Cuomo said. “When any prosecutor consciously disregards that fundamental duty, communities suffer and lose faith in the system, and they must have a forum to be heard and seek justice. This first-in-the-nation Commission will serve to give New Yorkers comfort that there is a system of checks and balances in the criminal justice system, and to root out any potential abuses of power to ensure that our justice system is just for all New Yorkers.”

Senator John DeFrancisco said, “There have been many cases of individuals who’ve been wrongfully convicted and who’ve served jail time because of the misconduct of some prosecutors. Despite the good work of most prosecutors, there must be a remedy against those who violate the law. This prosecutorial conduct commission legislation, signed by the Governor today, will provide that remedy and also provide oversight by an independent body, which over time will change the conduct of the wrongdoing of prosecutors, and help to ensure all a fairer criminal justice system.”

Governor Cuomo also led a successful effort to expand New York’s DNA databank in 2012, making New York the first state in the nation to require DNA samples from anyone convicted of a felony or Penal Law misdemeanor.

The Governor also established the Work for Success Initiative which has helped over 18,000 formerly incarcerated people find work upon their release.

Court Reporters And Captioners Are In Demand

Posted on: September 4th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

Becoming a court reporter is a sure-fire path to a good job, experts say.

A recent National Court Reporters Association survey that looked at the trends affecting job opportunities in the profession found there will be 5,500 job openings available in the field across the country in the next five years, Smart Business Cleveland reported.

Miami court reporters

The high tech solutions adopted by CourtScribes Miami court reporters could help solve personnel shortages.

“We have a 100 percent employment rate for graduates,” Kelly Moranz, program manager and adjunct faculty in the Captioning and Court Reporting program at Cuyahoga Community College, told Smart Business. “I’m always getting calls about job openings. Court reporters and captionists are being hired locally and all over the country.”

She said part of the reason for the strong demand is that many court reporters are retiring, so jobs are opening up but there aren’t enough people to fill them.

Also, a lack of awareness about the profession means people don’t often think of it as a career choice, something that court reporting programs are working locally and nationally change.

Moranz said flexibility is one attractive feature about the job. Captioners and court reporters often can work from home with significant earning potential. She said it’s not uncommon for experienced reporters to earn more than $100,000 a year.

She said new reporters might start out doing freelance work like deposition hearings, arbitrations or CART captioning for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community In court

There are also video captioning opportunities, including post-production jobs for companies like Nextflix and Hulu.

Training programs typically teach students the skills they need to earn their National Court Reporters Association or National Verbatim Reporters Association certification. There is also an associate degree option, which typically takes two years to complete.

The emphasis in court reporting is on accuracy and performance,  so students need to practice regularly to be successful.

Moranz noted that captioning and court reporting is an in-demand field offering excellent pay and great flexibility for those willing to put in the work.

Legal Professional Sues Amazon Over Exempt Status

Posted on: August 20th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

A former paralegal at Amazon.com Inc. is suing the company, alleging that the online retail giant misclassified paralegals as exempt employees, The Puget Sound Business Journal reported.

Paralegals and court reporters are both crucial to the legal process.

Court reporters

Miami court reporters Courtscribes bring technology to the table.

The lawsuit alleges that Amazon wrongfully misclassified paralegals as exempt employees, meaning that they were not subject to state and federal rules that required the company to pay them overtime for working more than 40 hours a week and to give them scheduled, set times for meal and rest breaks,  the Puget Sound Business Journal reported.

The lawsuit was filed in King County Superior Court in Seattle on Aug. 1. Filing the lawsuit was  former Amazon employee, Lorraine Colby of Bellevue, who said she worked as a paralegal for Amazon from June 2012 to June 2017.

Amazon is headquartered in Seattle and is looking to open a second headquarters somewhere else in the United States. The company has not responded to the lawsuit in court and a spokeswoman declined to comment to the Puget Sound Business Journal when contacted Aug 16.

“In its never-ending search to save money from its employees, Amazon willfully misclassified its paralegals to save on overtime and avoid the requirements of meal and rest breaks under Washington state law,” the Business Journal quoted the lawsuit as saying.

The lawsuit alleges that Amazon’s legal department was “advised on multiple occasions that these employees were misclassified based on their job duties.”

Amazon onboarding documents told paralegals they were expected to work 50 hours per week to meet the minimum requirements of their job, the lawsuit said, but they were not paid 1.5 times their regular pay for working more than 40 hours per week.

The lawsuit said because paralegals can’t “independently determine their own work product, settle cases, and determine strategy or impact policy or procedure without the authorization of an in-house lawyer” they are not exempt employees.

The lawsuit seeks class-action status to include any paralegals who worked for Amazon in Washington state after August 2015 and were classified as exempt.

Houston Man Holds Guinness World Record As Fastest Court Reporter

Posted on: August 13th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

Who’s the fastest court reporter in the world? According to Guinness World Records, it’s

Mark Kislingbury, who can type 360 words per minute on his stenomachine.

Kislingbury set the record in 2004, securing his place in the Guinness World Record book as well as his place in history.

But Houston, Texas native Kislingbury is not happy to just sit back and relax now that he holds the world record, he told WGNO TV while he was attending the National Court Reporters Association convention in New Orleans recently.

court reporters

There’s still a place for courtroom stenography in the technological revolution by court reporting agency CourtScribes.

“I’m going to keep practicing in hopes of breaking my own record.  Hopefully in the next few years I can break it by typing 370 or 380 words per minute,” he said.

“It is wonderful to hold the record because only a small amount of people have a World Record, and I have one,”  he said.

Kislingbury, who said he has been a court reporter for 35 years, uses a stenomachine. While he was at the recent convention in New Orleans, he competed in a “real-time” competition in which he had 99 percent accuracy.

“Using this machine is using shorthand.  I make so many shortcuts, it allows me to go faster than most people,”  Kislingbury said.

He encouraged more people to learn his profession, which is seeing shortages across the United States.

“There’s a big demand.  There are jobs everywhere,” he said.  “The money is good.  The job satisfaction is good.  The job is challenging, so not everyone can do it, but that’s why we get paid so well.”

Guinness World Records says its mission is to make the amazing official. They seek to inspire people — individuals, families, schools, teams, groups, companies and communities – of any age, in any city or country, to be inspired by reading, watching, listening to and participating in record-breaking.

To become the ultimate global authority on record breaking, Guiness World Records

researches, measures, documents and authorizes the world’s superlatives, then creates products that entertain, inform and inspire people through our unique window on the world.

NCRA Adds Three New Corporate Partners

Posted on: August 6th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), the country’s leading organization representing stenographic captioners, court reporters, and legal videographers, announced that three major industry leaders serving or representing the court reporting and captioning professions have signed on to the Association’s corporate partnership program, NCRA said in a press release.

court reporters

There’s still a place for courtroom stenography in the technological revolution by court reporting agency CourtScribes.

NCRA welcomed MacCormac College, Chicago, Ill., Magna Legal Services, Philadelphia, Pa., And U.S.  and Legal Support, Washington, D.C., as corporate partners.

NCRA’s Corporate Partnership program, which ranges in levels of support from $10,000 to $100,000, aids in business and workforce development efforts by NCRA and the National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF).

“We continue to focus on the next generation of captioners and court reporters by illustrating that these professions are viable and lucrative career opportunities,” said NCRA executive director and CEO Marcia Ferranto. “We’re excited about the diversity of the organizations that are joining our commitment to closing the shortage gap of stenographers nationally.”

“NCRA recognizes that there are various methods available to capture the spoken word, but our emphasis is on ensuring that both the general public and the legal industry understand that stenography is by far the most effective and desired method,” Ferranto said

The court reporting and captioning professions offer viable career choices that do not require a four-year college degree and yet offer good salaries, flexible schedules, and interesting venues. There is currently an increasing demand for more reporters and captioners to meet the growing number of employment opportunities available nationwide and abroad.

Court reporters and captioners rely on the latest in technology to use stenographic machines to capture the spoken word and translate it into written text in real time. These professionals work both in and out of the courtroom recording legal cases and depositions, providing live captioning of events, and assisting members of the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities with gaining access to information, entertainment, educational opportunities, and more.

South Carolina Is Feeling The Pinch Of Court Reporter Shortage

Posted on: July 30th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments

The shortage of court reporters is being felt in Horry County, South Carolina, and Bobbi Fisher of Myrtle Beach, who works as a court reporter in Horry County’s Family Court, says she’s afraid  that when her generation leaves the courtroom there won’t be anyone to replace them.

Ginny Jones, spokesperson for the S.C. Judicial Department, said that since fewer people are entering the profession and the numbers of new court reporters hasn’t kept up with retirements, machines are the obvious choice to remedy the problem.

She said the South Carolina Court Administration is already experimenting with digital recorders.

“In January 2018, the S.C. Supreme Court issued an order for a Digital Courtroom Recorder Project,” Jones told The Horry Independent. “This proven technology, which is operated in courtrooms by trained staff, is now capturing the record effectively in five courtrooms and is coming to more this year.”

But Jones went on to note that technology is not replacing human court reporters where they are available.

“It is important to note that we view digital recording as a supplement to court reporting; it has never replaced an existing court reporter, nor do we intend for it to.”

If no court reporters are available, the courts are more likely to take plea bargains over trials. Defendants who opt for a trial will have to wait until the proper staff is available.

South Carolina Senator Greg Hembree called the court reporter shortage a “huge” problem.

“Yes, it is a huge problem, especially in Family Court,” he said. “We’ve got judges that can’t hold court because they don’t have court reporters.”

He said the government is willing to increase court reporter salaries if  need be.

He calls letting machines help with recording court proceedings “a good experiment” but said, “In the meantime, we’ve got cases that are not getting heard.”

Poor Californians Win Right To Court Reporters

Posted on: July 16th, 2018 by Dependable Website Management No Comments
court reporter

The California Supreme Court has ruled everyone is entitled to a court reporter in that state.

The California Supreme Court has enshrined the right to a private court reporter in civil cases, whether they can afford one or not.

Judges on the court ruled unanimously that everyone is entitled to a verbatim record of their proceeding. The ruling is a reaction to cost-cutting in San Diego County that deprived some civil litigants of the services of a court reporter.

According to Courthouse News Service:

“By precluding an indigent litigant from obtaining the attendance of an official court reporter (to which the litigant would be entitled without payment of a fee), while at the same time preserving the right of financially able litigants to obtain an officially recognized pro tempore court reporter, the challenged court policy creates the type of restriction of meaningful access to the civil judicial process that the relevant California in forma pauperis precedents and legislative policy render impermissible,” Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye wrote. “Accordingly, we conclude that the court policy in question is invalid as applied to plaintiff and other fee waiver recipients, and that an official court reporter, or other valid means to create an official verbatim record for purposes of appeal, must generally be made available to in forma pauperis litigants upon request.”

The ruling acknowledges the importance of a verbatim record from a qualified court reporter in such issues as appeals.

Michael Shipley, who argued the case before the California Supreme Court on behalf of Barry Jameson, a prison inmate who brought the suit, said, “I practice in state court all the time for nonindigent litigants and we’re all sensitive to the fact that the courts don’t have unlimited amounts of money. But the court was clear that the solution to that problem cannot exist to deny access to justice for poor litigants. Access to justice is a huge civil rights issue and we had 40 different organizations that either filed or joined amicus briefs because this issue was affecting in a negative way all kinds of people’s rights to petition the government for redress of their grievances.”