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CourtScribes and the Future of Legal Proceedings

Posted on: January 15th, 2024 by Sfl Media No Comments

court reporting, CourtScribes

In an era where digital transformation is reshaping industries, the legal field is no exception. CourtScribes is at the vanguard of this revolution, offering a suite of advanced court reporting services that redefine the legal proceedings’ landscape. From remote depositions to live-streaming and video-to-text synchronization, CourtScribes is not just responding to the changing demands of the legal profession but is actively shaping its future.

Remote Depositions: A Paradigm Shift in Legal Processes

The concept of remote depositions has gained significant traction, especially in recent global challenges that have necessitated a shift towards more flexible legal processes. CourtScribes’ remote deposition services stand out in this realm, offering a seamless and efficient way for legal professionals to conduct depositions irrespective of geographical barriers. This service is a testament to CourtScribes’ commitment to innovation and their understanding of the evolving needs of the legal community.

Cutting-Edge Legal Videography

Integrating professional legal videography into court reporting is another area where CourtScribes excels. By capturing high-quality video recordings of legal proceedings, they provide an invaluable tool for lawyers and legal professionals. These recordings offer a dynamic and detailed account of proceedings, going beyond the limitations of traditional text-based transcripts. CourtScribes takes accessibility to the next level with their 24/7 digital platforms. Offering unrestricted access to transcripts, exhibits, and videos, they ensure that legal professionals have the necessary resources at their fingertips, anytime and anywhere. This constant availability is crucial in a profession where timely access to information can be pivotal to the success of a case.

Live-Streaming and Synchronization Technologies

Embracing the latest in technology, CourtScribes offers live-streaming services, allowing stakeholders to engage with legal proceedings in real time, regardless of their physical location. Additionally, their sophisticated video-to-text synchronization technology marks a significant advancement in how legal professionals review and analyze case materials. By aligning video content with textual transcripts, they provide a more integrated and interactive way to examine testimonies and depositions.

Breaking Language Barriers with Interpreter Services

Understanding the diverse linguistic landscape of modern society, CourtScribes provides interpreter services to ensure inclusivity and fairness in legal proceedings. Their commitment to overcoming language barriers in the courtroom underscores their role as a comprehensive service provider catering to the multifaceted needs of today’s legal environment.

Navigating the Legal Landscape with Video-To-Text Synchronization

In the realm of legal documentation, accuracy and detail are paramount. CourtScribes’ innovative video-to-text synchronization service addresses this need by offering a synchronized transcript that aligns precisely with the corresponding video footage. This feature is a game-changer for attorneys and legal professionals who can now analyze the verbal and non-verbal nuances of depositions and court testimonies with unprecedented precision. It enhances the review process, making it more efficient and effective, especially in complex cases where every detail counts.

The Rise of Digital Courtrooms

The transition towards digital courtrooms is another significant trend in the legal sector, and CourtScribes is at its forefront. By providing services that cater to this digital shift, including live-streaming and remote appearances, they are helping to shape a future where legal proceedings are more accessible, flexible, and efficient. This digital transformation is not just about convenience; it’s about opening up the legal process to broader participation and scrutiny, thereby enhancing transparency and justice.

Professional Legal Videography: Capturing Every Detail

The power of visual information in legal proceedings cannot be overstated, and CourtScribes’ professional legal videography service ensures that this power is fully harnessed. Their expert videographers use state-of-the-art equipment to capture high-definition video, ensuring that every gesture, expression, and spoken word is recorded with clarity. This visual documentation becomes an invaluable asset for legal teams as they prepare their cases, offering a layer of detail that traditional transcripts cannot provide.

Interpreters: Facilitating Fair and Inclusive Proceedings

CourtScribes’ commitment to inclusivity and fairness is further exemplified by their interpreter services. By ensuring that language barriers do not impede understanding or participation in legal proceedings, they uphold the principles of justice and equality. These services are crucial in a diverse society, ensuring that all parties, regardless of their language background, have equal access to justice.

Streamlining Legal Workflows with 24/7 Access

In today’s fast-paced legal environment, immediate access to case-related materials is crucial. CourtScribes’ platform offers round-the-clock access to transcripts, exhibits, and videos, streamlining legal workflows and enhancing productivity. This 24/7 access not only saves time but also allows legal teams to work more collaboratively and efficiently, responding to case developments with agility.

The Future of Court Reporting with CourtScribes

As we look to the future, the role of services like those offered by CourtScribes becomes increasingly significant. In an era where technology is reshaping every aspect of professional life, the legal sector is no exception. CourtScribes is not just adapting to these changes; they are actively driving them, setting new standards in court reporting and legal support services. Their comprehensive suite of services, combining technology, expertise, and a deep understanding of the legal industry’s needs, positions CourtScribes as a leader in the future of legal proceedings. Whether it’s through enhancing the accessibility of legal processes or providing advanced tools for case analysis, CourtScribes is playing a pivotal role in the evolution of the legal landscape.

Emphasizing Security and Confidentiality in Digital Transcripts

In the digital age, the security and confidentiality of legal documents are of paramount importance. CourtScribes recognizes this critical need and implements robust security measures to protect sensitive information. Their digital platforms are designed with advanced encryption and secure access protocols, ensuring that transcripts, videos, and other legal documents are safe from unauthorized access. This commitment to security is a cornerstone of their service, providing peace of mind to clients who entrust them with highly confidential legal information.

Customized Solutions for Diverse Legal Needs

Understanding that no two legal cases are alike, CourtScribes offers customized solutions tailored to meet the specific needs of each client. Whether it’s a large-scale litigation or a small, private legal matter, they provide personalized services that align with the unique requirements of each case. This flexibility and adaptability are what make CourtScribes a preferred choice for many legal professionals across the nation. At the core of CourtScribes’ success is their team of highly trained and experienced professionals. From court reporters and videographers to interpreters and technical support staff, each team member brings a wealth of expertise and a commitment to excellence. Regular training and professional development ensure that they stay at the forefront of the latest trends and technologies in the field of legal reporting and documentation.

Live-Streaming Court Reporting Services

CourtScribes’ live-streaming services bridge the gap between physical and digital courtrooms. This service enables legal professionals, clients, and other stakeholders to participate in proceedings remotely, bringing a new level of flexibility and accessibility to the legal process. Live-streaming is particularly beneficial in situations where travel is not feasible or when real-time observation is crucial.

As the legal industry continues to evolve, CourtScribes is poised to play a significant role in shaping its future. Their innovative services are not just about keeping up with the times; they are about setting a new standard for legal proceedings. The future they envision is one where legal processes are more accessible, efficient, and secure, thanks to the integration of advanced technologies and expert services.

Envisioning a New Era in Legal Proceedings with CourtScribes

As we reflect on the myriad ways CourtScribes is transforming the legal landscape, it becomes clear that they are not just a participant in this industry but a visionary leader. The services they provide, from remote depositions to live-streaming court appearances, are not merely responses to current trends; they are proactive steps toward creating a more efficient, accessible, and transparent legal process. At the heart of CourtScribes’ ethos is a relentless commitment to excellence and innovation. This commitment is evident in their continuous pursuit of new technologies and methodologies that can enhance the legal process. By integrating digital advancements into traditional court reporting, they are not just keeping pace with the times but are actively forging a new path for the future of the legal profession.

The legal landscape is in a constant state of flux, with new challenges and opportunities emerging regularly. CourtScribes’ ability to adapt to these changes while maintaining the highest standards of service is what sets them apart. Their adaptability is a testament to their understanding that the future of legal proceedings is dynamic and requires a flexible, forward-thinking approach. One of the most significant impacts of CourtScribes’ work is the expansion of access to justice. By removing geographical and logistical barriers through their remote services and providing high-quality documentation and interpretation services, they are making legal proceedings more accessible to a broader audience. This expansion is crucial in a society where access to justice is a fundamental right.

CourtScribes also play a pivotal role in enhancing collaboration within the legal community. Their services facilitate better communication and coordination among legal teams, clients, and the judiciary. This collaboration is essential in a complex legal ecosystem where the success of proceedings often depends on the seamless interaction of various stakeholders. As CourtScribes continues to innovate and expand its services, the future looks promising. Their dedication to integrating the latest technologies with professional expertise is paving the way for a more modern and efficient legal system. The potential for further advancements in legal videography, digital transcription, and remote legal services is vast, and CourtScribes is well-positioned to lead these developments.

CourtScribes is more than just a court reporting service; they are a key player in the evolution of the legal profession. Their comprehensive suite of services, combined with their commitment to innovation and excellence, positions them as a leader in the field. As the legal landscape continues to evolve, CourtScribes’ role in shaping its future remains crucial. They stand not just as a service provider but as a catalyst for change, driving the legal profession towards a more efficient, accessible, and collaborative future.

Technology Drives Changes In The Court Reporting Industry

Posted on: February 11th, 2019 by Sfl Media No Comments

Things are changing in the court reporting industry, and CourtScribes offers services that will help clients keep up with the major changes driven by budget cuts, court reporter shortages and new technology.

Although some proceedings in Florida still call for the presence of a traditional stenographer, the profession is being driven by technological change. Courts can no longer afford to have a stenographer in every courtroom and at every hearing, and the shortage of qualified stenographers makes the situation even more difficult.

CourtScribes remains at the forefront of technological changes by combining video, audio, and cloud technology with traditional stenography to offer unparalleled speed and accuracy in its verbatim record keeping.

The company uses professional-level recording systems to bring the most sophisticated digital technology into the private marketplace and provide the highest-quality transcripts, using computer-based digital systems with enhanced features that perform recording functions with convenience, flexibility, and economy.

Electronic recording equipment is overseen by an experienced reporter at all times. The reporter simultaneously takes notes that are time-linked to the corresponding recording, so people involved with the case can instantly find the point in the record where they want to re-listen.

Because primary participants are assigned to separate, discrete sound channels, it’s easy to identify who’s who.

“This voice isolation feature permits a full and accurate transcription of exactly what was said — and who said it — because each channel can be listened to individually,” entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger wrote in a company white paper.

A typical four-channel system individually records the judge, witness, plaintiff’s attorney and defendant’s attorney. When two or more parties talk at the same time, digital reporting captures each voice clearly on its own separate sound channel.

The recording process captures all words exactly as they are spoken without worrying about a person being unable to understand accents or dialects — which can lead to misunderstanding the meaning of testimony — as well as complex medical or technical terms.

Any portion of a recorded proceeding can be played back over audio speakers whenever the judge or counsel requires it.  Audio also can be replayed for jurors if they wish to review actual spoken testimony during deliberations.

Counsel can also obtain copies of the actual recording with digital annotations “hot-linked” to the audio so points of interest can be located quickly and efficiently.

Another benefit is that both log notes and audio files are transmitted over the internet, reducing or eliminating shipping costs and delivery delays. Storage and archiving are efficient because audio and log notes are saved as computer files.

Storage and archiving are efficient and compact because there are cassettes to store or reporters’ paper notes to file.

Another State Acknowledges Its Shortage Of Court Reporters

Posted on: November 26th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments

Court reporter shortages are reported across the country, and court reporting technology like the services provided by Court Scribes in Florida and other states may be a solution in some situations.

South Dakota is one of the states that’s feeling the effects of the court reporter shortage, according to KELO of Keloland Media Group in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Court reporting is one of several skilled trades that’s facing a shortage in South Dakota, along with plumbers and electricians, KELO reported.

“We know we’re going to have positions open, and we need bodies to fill them,” Official Court Reporter Carla Dedula of South Dakota’s Unified Judicial System said. Dedula is one of just 50 court reporters in the system. Of the 50, almost half will be eligible to retire in the next 10 years, and there are not necessarily younger people coming up behind them to fill the empty positions.

“Nationally there were 5,500 open positions last year,” Freelance Court Reporter Pat Beck told the TV station.

He pointed out that in some states, courts are having to reschedule court cases because there aren’t enough reporters to make a record of what’s going on in the courtroom.

There aren’t any brick and mortar programs in South Dakota any more where people can learn the skill of court reporting, meaning if people in the state are interested in pursuing the field, they have to get a degree online, which usually takes a couple of years.

CourtScribes uses professional-level recording systems to bring the most sophisticated digital technology into the private marketplace and provide the highest quality transcripts.

Advanced technology helps make trials easier in many ways. There are many benefits of court technology, the most important being that people who can’t attend the trial can view the transcript in real-time if they have an internet connection.

Courtroom Recording Technology Offers Distinct Advantages

Posted on: November 12th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments

Advanced technology helps make trials easier in many ways. Christianity Today recently listed some of the benefits of court technology, the most important being that people who can’t attend the trial can view the transcript in real-time if they have an internet connection.

Here are some other advantages to having courtroom recording technology, per Christianity Today:

Immediate admission to the transcript

Attorneys can see the transcript while the trial is still going on, enabling them to quickly change their tactics if need be and strategize how to best question a witness. It also enables them to see clearly what was asked and answered earlier in the trial so they can re-state information if they need clarification.

Private messaging off the record

Attorneys can record off-the-record conversations via real-time instant messaging, saving time and averting any interruptions that might delay of the trial.

Live review

Real-time reporting allows the counsel’s teammates to see the  transcript instantly and formulate follow-up questions. They can also rephrase their queries if they did not get the response from the witness that they were looking for.

Cost efficiency

Attorneys can see a rough draft of the transcript before the final and official, making it much easier for them to prepare for the next day of questioning, which is cost-efficient for both the client and the attorney.

Testimonies can get impeached instantly

An instant transcript helps an attorney in the courtroom to impeach a witness instantly if necessary.

CourtScribes uses professional-level recording systems to bring the most sophisticated digital technology into the private marketplace and provide the highest quality transcripts.

The company uses computer-based digital systems with enhanced features that perform recording functions with convenience, flexibility, and economy.

Electronic recording equipment is overseen by an experienced reporter at all times. The reporter simultaneously takes notes that are time-linked to the corresponding recording, so people involved with the case can instantly find the point in the record where they want to re-listen.

Indiana Supreme Court shifts in big way to electronic filing

Posted on: October 1st, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments

High-tech solutions like the court reporting technology CourtScribes provides make the courtroom run more smoothly. And there are other important technological advances coming to courtrooms as well. One of them that increases efficiency and saves time and money is electronic filing.

For example, the Indiana Supreme Court is turning to electronic filing to reduce the paperwork that was created by the 1.3 million cases filed in Indiana’s state courts in the past year, The Statehouse File of Franklin College reported.

Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Loretta Rush said in the court’s 2017-2018 annual report that the goal is to switch almost every county court system to electronic filing over the next year.

Part of the problem is that more than a million cases being filed each year, courts are running out of room to file and store the paperwork, and electronic filing will create a more efficient, more accessible system while saving the court system money.

The electronic document filing system, along with new notification systems, will also help create more transparency among the courts and the public, Rush said. The court system also recently started sending reminder messages to defendants via text reminding them of important appointments like court dates.

Counties in the system have sent more than 160,000 text reminders in the past month alone.

“There was a real push with the courts with regards to advancing technology. We had about 90 percent of our counties involved in electronic filing in some form and we had 80 percent of our counties in a unified case management system,” Rush told The Statehouse File.

The court system has also increased security measures to make sure that the electronic records are fully protected, including putting the  entire system is behind the state’s technology firewall,

“We have a team in court administration for technology working on cyber security,” Rush said.

New York Adds Watchdog Organization For Prosecutors

Posted on: September 17th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments

Accurate court reporting is an important part of the criminal justice system, and so is fairness in prosecution.

New York state is working to reform its court system, and as part of that effort, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has signed legislation establishing the nation’s first State Commission on Prosecutorial Conduct.

The Commission will review and investigate prosecutorial conduct to address allegations of misconduct which lead to malicious prosecutions and wrongful convictions, frequently impacting people of color and marginalized communities.

By avoiding wrongful convictions and associated retrial costs and settlements, the Commission will save taxpayers money, the state said in a statement.

“Our criminal justice system must fairly convict the guilty and exonerate the innocent,” Governor Cuomo said. “When any prosecutor consciously disregards that fundamental duty, communities suffer and lose faith in the system, and they must have a forum to be heard and seek justice. This first-in-the-nation Commission will serve to give New Yorkers comfort that there is a system of checks and balances in the criminal justice system, and to root out any potential abuses of power to ensure that our justice system is just for all New Yorkers.”

Senator John DeFrancisco said, “There have been many cases of individuals who’ve been wrongfully convicted and who’ve served jail time because of the misconduct of some prosecutors. Despite the good work of most prosecutors, there must be a remedy against those who violate the law. This prosecutorial conduct commission legislation, signed by the Governor today, will provide that remedy and also provide oversight by an independent body, which over time will change the conduct of the wrongdoing of prosecutors, and help to ensure all a fairer criminal justice system.”

Governor Cuomo also led a successful effort to expand New York’s DNA databank in 2012, making New York the first state in the nation to require DNA samples from anyone convicted of a felony or Penal Law misdemeanor.

The Governor also established the Work for Success Initiative which has helped over 18,000 formerly incarcerated people find work upon their release.

Shortage Of Court Reporters Plays Out Across Country

Posted on: July 2nd, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Court reporters

Court reporters are missing from many courtrooms.

Courthouses across the country are lacking some key people as court reporters reach retirement age without replacements.

That’s just what has happened in Macon County, Illinois, when a court reporter there retired, according to the local newspaper, the Herald & Review. The paper reports that the lack of court reporters is playing out across Illinois.

According to the newspaper:

A snapshot of the problem: There are job openings listed online for court reporters, or stenographers, in 11 of the state’s 24 judicial circuits, and officials say that may not cover every opening in the state. Illinois had 506 licensed court reporters as of January 2017, and 136 of those were eligible for retirement, according to data from the court reporting division of the Administrative Office of Illinois Courts.

“We definitely need a new generation to come in,” said Kathryn Thomas, president of the Illinois Court Reporter Association, which has more than 300 members.

The shortage of court reporters has officials such as Winnebago, Ill., County Judge Eugene Doherty concerned, according to television station WREX.

The station reports:

“We are concerned.  Of that 500 we’re looking at maybe half of them or more being replaced in the next ten years,” says Chief Judge Doherty.

As the current workforce prepares to retire, court systems like Winnebago County are working to recruit the next generation of workers…

“A court reporter has to keep up with a lot of things and we rely on them and their skill in order to make sure that record is accurate,” says Doherty.

Firms such as CourtScribes are growing, though, thanks to a combination of technology and highly-trained traditional stenographers.

We pride ourselves on creating completely accurate verbatim transcripts, no matter how chaotic the environment. The best way to do that is through hiring the best court reporters and combining them with unique, powerful, industry-leading technology.

Artificial Intelligence Makes Inroads On Legal Profession

Posted on: June 25th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
technology

Artificial intelligence is making inroads in the legal profession.

A recent experiment sheds light on the changes technology has in store for the legal profession. In this case, artificial intelligence bested lawyers in one aspect of legal work.

According to Mashable:

A new study, conducted by legal AI platform LawGeex in consultation with law professors from Stanford University, Duke University School of Law, and University of Southern California, pitted twenty experienced lawyers against an AI trained to evaluate legal contracts.

Competitors were given four hours to review five non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) and identify 30 legal issues, including arbitration, confidentiality of relationship, and indemnification. They were scored by how accurately they identified each issue.
Unfortunately for humanity, we lost the competition — badly.
Human lawyers were 85 percent accurate, while the machines were 95 percent accurate. The technology was also way faster, taking 26 seconds to complete their task, while humans took 92 minutes.
All that isn’t actually bad news for humans. “Having the AI do a first review of an NDA, much like having a paralegal issue spot, would free up valuable time for lawyers to focus on client counseling and other higher-value work,” said Erika Buell, clinical professor at Duke University School of Law.
In fact, attorneys are already using AI in the real world to enhance their work, according to Small Firm Central.
Small Firm Central reports:
If you envision some kind of futuristic world with robots running the show, you’re thinking way too far into the future. Artificial intelligence (AI) is already here. In our everyday lives – and in our professional lives. It’s prevalent in the workflows of legal professionals everywhere, not only helping automate common tasks to make our jobs easier and more efficient, but also helping us practice law more confidently, allowing us to provide better service to our clients. Here are five ways AI is being used in the legal industry today.

Technology Alters Legal Profession Along With Court Reporting

Posted on: June 18th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporters

There’s still a place for courtroom stenography in the technological revolution by court reporting agency CourtScribes.

All aspects of the legal profession are being altered by technology, as are those of court reporting.

Billionaire 365 points out that technology has changed the way lawyers bill their clients, how corporate legal departments operate, how legal filings are done, and has improved research. According to Billionaire 365 reports:

Technology in the courtroom isn’t just limited to software. Many courtrooms today are equipped with state of the art technology that allows lawyers to present their cases on built-in monitors, and while cameras and other equipment have increased courtroom security.

Lastly, technology has made legal researcha more efficient and less time consuming. Legal professionals can now access a wide range of legal databases to do their research and verify case laws. While law libraries still do exist, and may not yet be near extinction, electronic research is now the most common method of gathering information.

With all these changes and advantages in technology, and the enormous impact it has had on the legal profession, it is imperative for lawyers, paralegals and other legal professionals to become tech savvy. Those who want to be successful in the legal field must be open to learning about and using new technology in their practices, or get left behind.

CourtScribes knows a thing or two about leveraging technology to improve both its business and the legal system.

Here’s a rundown of some of Courtscribes’ services:

Court Reporter Shortage Hits Home In South Carolina

Posted on: June 4th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporter

A court reporter shortage means choosing the career could set you up for success in the job market.

All around the country, there’s a court reporter shortage. In South Carolina, that shortage has become particularly acute.

The Charleston Post and Courier reports that more than a quarter of that state’s court reporter positions are vacant. Those vacancies are resulting in delays and last-minute cancellations of proceedings across the state, the newspaper reports.

According to the Post and Courier:

Rescheduled hearings can mean additional expenses for litigants, according to a Family Court judge who said she and others on the bench are upset by how they say the state has failed to recruit and hire reporters.

The S.C. Court Administration supervises the trained stenographers who transcribe verbatim records of Circuit and Family Court proceedings. A wave of retirements and a lack of training at state technical colleges has created the shortage, the office says.

The judge, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, disagrees with that explanation.

“This whole shortage has been a creation of the court system. It’s a total disruption. … Court reporters are trying to apply and not getting hired.”

The South Carolina troubles are an extreme example of a nationwide trend, and one that’s expected to grow more acute. Retirements and increased demand are leading to court reporter shortages across the country.

A study by Ducker Worldwide predicts a shortage of court reporters in the coming year, as court reporting professionals retire without enough replacements ready to fill their shoes.

According to Ducker Worldwide: “Increased legal activity and new opportunities will drive demand despite the steady transition of some courts to digital recording. Decreased enrollment and graduation rates for court reporters, combined with significant retirement rates, will create by 2018 a critical shortfall projected to represent nearly 5,500 court reporting positions.”

Ducker Worldwide predicts there will still be a strong market for courtroom stenography in the years to come.

Want To Be A Court Reporter? Here’s How

Posted on: May 21st, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Supreme Court

The Supreme Court slowly adopts new technology

If you want to follow a strong career path and become a court reporter, there are some practical steps you can take.

Here are a few of them.

Pick an area of specialization

According to CourtReporter EDU.org, there are multiple paths you can take in this versatile career. “Although all court reporter programs have the same, basic structure as to prepare students for state licensure and/or professional certification, some schools divide their court reporter programs in a number of ways to best prepare students for specific areas of court reporting, while others provide a more comprehensive approach to court reporting.”

Be sure you’re prepared for the court reporter program

CourtReporter EDU.org writes, “Students are then often required to rent or purchase a model computerized writer for CAT classes. Purchasing a new computerized writer may cost upwards of $2,000, while used models can be purchased for as little as $400. Given the cost of computerized writers, many students choose to rent these models. Software for the computerized writers may also cost an additional $100 to $500. Individuals should also be prepared to take entrance exams prior to being accepted into a court reporter program. Entrance exams are usually in typing and English, and students should have an excellent grasp of the English language before applying to a court reporter program.”

Complete your program

“The path to a court reporting career is rather standard in terms of education. Specifically, individuals must complete a recognized court reporting program. However, where this education is obtained may differ, as court reporting programs are available in a number of institutions, from community colleges to dedicated court reporter schools. A court reporting program may therefore result in an associate’s degree or professional diploma or certificate, depending on the institution in which the program is located,” writes CourtReporter EDU.org. “It is common for court reporting programs to be quite flexible, with many institutions offering a number of online courses and day and evening classes to accommodate today’s busy lifestyles.”

Texas Group Looks To Educate Next Generation Of Court Reporters

Posted on: May 14th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporters

There’s still a place for courtroom stenography in the technological revolution by court reporting agency CourtScribes.

With a shortage looming, a group of Texas court reporters has taken the unusual step of raising money to educate the next generation of court reporters.

The Texas Deposition Reporters Association has raised $11,000 to help fund Project Steno, which provides educational opportunities for stenographers. According to a press release:

There is a very critical nationwide shortage of court reporters affecting the legal system, and many in the industry are coming together to employ creative solutions to solve this looming crisis. Project Steno is designed to help promising new reporting students, recruited through a free introduction to court reporting known as the Steno A to Z Program, with their court reporting school tuition. TEXDRA recently concluded its first successful Steno A to Z class, and there are several more classes happening statewide; the program is also now featured online.

The initial first step in Project Steno’s 4-step plan is to engage prospective court reporting students in one of many A to Z programs being delivered by volunteer court reporters across the U.S. Students who graduate from an A to Z program and are then accepted by Project Steno will be offered tuition assistance when they choose to attend a Project Steno Partner Program. TEXDRA is very proud to be engaged in this complementary, innovative and unprecedented effort.

“Nothing we face as a profession is more important than joining forces to stimulate interest in the opportunities available through a career in court reporting,” said David Ross, president of TEXDRA. “We put out an appeal to our members for Project Steno, and we raised over $10,000 in what felt like a blink of an eye. TEXDRA’s members are the best!”

While there is the possibility of shortages of court reporters, in many ways, there’s never been a better time to be part of the business, thanks to advances in technology, solid salaries, and increasing demand.

Technology Will Aid Court Reporters, Not Replace Them

Posted on: May 7th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Court reporting agency

Court reporting agency CourtScribes combines competence with tech prowess.

Technological disruption can spark justifiable fear for jobs in any industry. But it can also be a huge boon, as is the case for court reporters.

That’s because, despite major technological breakthroughs by companies such as court reporting agency CourtScribes, the demand for traditional courtroom stenography remains strong at the same time tech helps drive service improvements.

As Los Angeles business writer Jesse Caitland writes:

Thanks to the increase of litigation in the fields of business law, medical malpractice, probate law and other areas of practice, the sheer volume of requests for deposition experts has increased in a corresponding number as the American economy grows. This means that court reporting firms large and small, are experiencing a sort of renaissance…

While developments like automatic checkout (without the presence of a cashier) and electronic banking, have heavily negatively impacted the job force, forcing many people to look for new careers, the legal professions as diverse as expert witnesses, videographers, stenographers, marketers and others have all experienced a steady and improved series of workload increases.

No firm better exemplifies the combination of traditional services with cutting edge technology than CourtScribes.

Professor and entrepreneur Barry Unger writes: “As a cofounder of Kurzweil Computer Products, Inc., an early artificial intelligence and digital imaging company which then became Xerox Imaging Systems, I saw first-hand the enormous positive impact of what is now called digital photography, and how this new capability has both improved the quality of photography and equally importantly opened up active photography to a much bigger audience and to new uses. Think for example how many of the countless unforeseen ways we now on a regular basis use the electronic cameras built into our phones to communicate with each other and facilitate our work flow, and even recording images like damage to our cars or receipts for expense reports or to identify items for purchase, or to make video calls around the world, and how integral video recording is becoming to law enforcement activities. This of course is the impact disruptive technologies can have. Looking at the already successful implementations of CourtScribes’ technology and internet based service, I can see an analogous type of phenomenon beginning to happen in the legal industry, where court reporting and videography will become a new standard, a “no-brainer” as it were.”

Court Reporting Profession Evolves With Technology, Budget Changes

Posted on: April 30th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporting agency

Court reporting agency CourtScribes helps fair administration of justice by providing accurate records of proceedings.

The court reporting industry is in the midst of major changes, as budget cuts combine with technology to drive different ways of doing things.

According to The Jacksonville Daily Record:

Legal stenography has changed from long rolls of paper to digital transcription. Facing budget cuts, courts can no longer afford to have a stenographer in every courtroom and at every hearing.

Technology is allowing both sides to continue to survive and succeed.

In Florida, some proceedings still call for the presence of a traditional stenographer, while others are staffed by a recorder. Either one, though, is driven by technological change.

Court reporting agency CourtScribes has been at the forefront of technological changes in the profession. The company combines video, audio, and cloud technology with traditional stenography to offer unparalleled speed and accuracy in its verbatim record keeping.

CourtScribes process includes:

 

What To Look For In A Court Reporting Agency

Posted on: April 23rd, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporting agency

Court reporting agency CourtScribes prides itself on competence.

Not all court reporting firms are created equal. That’s why it pays to get it right when it comes to choosing the right court reporting agency.

Some of those important considerations include.

Experience

You’ll want to check on the longevity of the court reporting agency you work with. That’s not the only indicator of quality, certainly, but it can help you choose.

“If a firm that has been operating for many years, this may be a sign that it is stable,” according to The Global Dispatch. “It means that it has been able to sustain the services it offers to its clients. It would have built its systems to provide its clients’ with what it needs.”

CourtScribes’ executive team has decades of experience working in the legal system.

Reliability

Accuracy, punctuality and reliability are crucial in choosing the court reporting agency to help you.

“Dealing with a professional firm ensures reliable service,” according to Global Dispatch. “You will expect the court reporter from the company to be professional in how they work. They will be punctual and thus allow smooth proceedings to happen.”

CourtScribes takes pride in creating an accurate, verbatim record of proceedings no matter how chaotic the environment is and uses unique, industry-leading technology in that quest.

Offers innovative services

The world doesn’t stand still. The legal profession doesn’t stand still. Your court reporting agency shouldn’t stand still either.

CourtScribes works on the cutting edge of technology, including providing on-demand video. Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes, “CourtScribes is able to leverage its process and technology to provide live and on-demand video or audio recording to attorneys in the office at marginal cost. Attorneys not only benefit from a less expensive transcript but the video and/or audio recording provides them with a more accurate and complete record. The digital recording reveals the demeanor of a witness and whether, for instance, they were being sarcastic. In addition, the live video and/or audio feed can be watched by attorneys in the office, allowing the office team to monitor the proceedings and more effectively assist the attorneys in the courtroom.”

Firms Like Court Reporting Agency CourtScribes Are Improving The Legal System

Posted on: April 16th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporting agency

There’s still a place for courtroom stenography in the technological revolution by court reporting agency CourtScribes.

The legal system can seem stuffy, hidebound and resistant to change. But firms like court reporting agency CourtScribes are changing that.

And that’s very much a good thing. The changes the court reporting agency and others are bringing about amount to a revolution in the courthouse that will bring costs down and democratize access to the legal system.

Courtscribes sees the changes as an opportunity rather than a threat.

Cloud computing combined with digital and audio advances put Courtscribes ahead of the pack when it comes to both the accuracy and cost of its court reporting.

“CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases,” writes Barry Unger, a professor and entrepreneur, in a white paper.

CourtScribes’ services include:

What Can Legal Innovators Like Court Reporting Agency CourtScribes Learn From Theranos?

Posted on: April 2nd, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporting agency

Court reporting agency CourtScribes is all about innovation.

Theranos promised cutting edge health care results. The trouble was, those claims weren’t true, and that’s something innovators in the legal industry should take seriously. Court reporting agency CourtScribes certainly does.

Carolyn Elefant, writing for Above The Law, points out that there are lessons for legal innovators in the story of Theranos.

Elefant writes:

Theranos’s technology wasn’t ready for prime time.

But rather than come clean, Theranos kept the fairy tale going long after the clock struck midnight. According to the SEC complaint, Theranos employed third-parties to run its purportedly innovative blood tests using conventional technology, while continuing to represent to investors that it ran the tests in-house. (Complaint ¶49). Theranos also told investors that it had multiple contracts with the military and that its testing devices had been employed on the battlefield and in medevac helicopters when the Department of Defense had only used it once in a study. (Complaint ¶68). In late 2015, a Wall Street Journalreport exposed many of Theranos’s false claims and in turn set in motion investigations by other regulators, including the SEC.

So how does something like this happen with sophisticated investors and wide media coverage of technology companies? Easy. Everyone loves a disruptor.

Enfant argues that similar things happen in the legal industry.

At the same time, true innovators like the CourtScribes court reporting agency really are changing things up.

“CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases,” writes Barry Unger, a professor and entrepreneur, in a white paper.

Tech Savvy Court Reporting Agency Helps Usher Attorneys Into Digital Age

Posted on: March 26th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporting agency

Technological advances are changing the legal system and court reporting agency CourtScribes is at the forefront.

Lawyers are not well-known for their embrace of digital technology. Still, slowly but surely, the legal profession is changing, helped along by pioneers like Florida court reporting agency CourtScribes.

The digital disruption of the legal system can be seen in everything from the way evidence is presented to how CourtScribes uses technology to enhance traditional courtroom stenography.

According to The Expert Insitute:

The formal, ceremonious nature of the law has never been synonymous with advanced technology and electronics. Even in as late as 2010, only 20 percent of attorneys surveyed by the American Bar Association reported using a laptop for courtroom presentations. However, in recent years, attorneys both in and out of the courtroom have been slowly but surely adapting to the digital age and utilizing certain computer technologies to assist in their case. After all, in only the past five years, there has been a 484% increase in global patent filings for new legal services technology.

Companies like court reporting agency CourtScribes are playing a large role in the digital transformation of the legal industry. Thanks to video, cloud computing and Internet communications technology, CourtScribes is able to provide an expanded suite of services that includes traditional stenography, but also video feeds and other services.

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes that the court reporting agency is leading a wave of change to disrupt the centuries-old profession.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

How The Miami Court Reporters At CourtScribes Embrace Technology That Helps Solve Shortages

Posted on: March 19th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Miami court reporters

The high tech solutions adopted by CourtScribes Miami court reporters could help solve personnel shortages.

In some states, there’s a shortage of a key ingredient in the smooth running of courthouses. That kind of shortage points out one of the advantages inherent in the technology embrace by the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes.

One of the states facing court reporter shortages is South Carolina. According to the Charleston Post & Courier:

A lack of court reporters in South Carolina — trained stenographers who transcribe verbatim records of proceedings — is causing last-minute cancellations of hearings ranging from divorces to criminal pleas. To officials and observers, this means time wasted, taxpayer money lost and added stress on victims, witnesses and families.

While court reporters often blend into the background, proceedings grind to a halt in their absence.

“It’s one spoke in the whole gear, but it’s stopping up the whole system,” said 15th Circuit Solicitor Jimmy Richardson, who oversees prosecutions in Horry and Georgetown counties. “Everybody’s been impacted.”

More than a quarter of court reporter positions within the S.C. Judicial Department are vacant. With 36 job openings and only 94 reporters working in family and circuit courts across the state, officials said it can be difficult and sometimes impossible to find an employee to fill in when a reporter calls off work.

CourtScribes’ Miami court reporters use technology to revolutionize the court reporting process, which helps overcome such shortages.

The company uses advances in cloud computing, audio and video technology to enhance its courtroom stenography services, building a more accurate and accessible record while bringing down costs in the process.

“CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases,” writes Barry Unger, a professor and entrepreneur, in a white paper.

If The Miami Court Reporters Of CourtScribes Can Innovate, So Can Lawyers

Posted on: March 5th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Miami court reporters

The Miami court reporters of CourtScribes embrace innovation in ways lawyers should as well.

Innovation is a key to improving the legal system, something the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes have taken to heart and other players are learning.

Ivy Grey writes in Evolve The Law that lawyers need to embrace innovation themselves:

Too many lawyers with great ideas that could improve legal practice are discouraged from even trying to innovate. As lawyers, we assume that innovation must mean invention, technology, and programming. By accepting that assumption, we are accepting the belief that innovation is something that other people do. But that’s not true. Innovation can be any new process or new way of thinking — and that can be game changing. Innovating is for lawyers, and lawyers already have the skills to be innovators. No coding necessary.

Who could be better to find innovative ways to solve our client’s problems than us? Let’s put lawyers back in the mix of innovating for a better future of legal practice. We can do that by expanding our concept of what it means to innovate and who can be an innovator.

We believe that we’re incapable of solving our own problems because most of us aren’t programmers. But the legal profession is missing out on untold new ideas — and diversity — because we allow the assumption that the ability to program is a prerequisite for innovation to thrive. This assumption means we get caught up in technology and miss innovations and possibilities right in front of us.

The Miami court reporters of CourtScribes is on the leading edge of innovation within the legal system.

While CourtScribes offers traditional courtroom stenography, it adds high tech audio, cloud-based services and courtroom video to the mix in a way that increases accuracy while decreasing cost.

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes that the court reporting agency is leading a wave of change to disrupt the centuries-old profession.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

Miami Court Reporters News: The Tech Behind Bitcoin Could Have Big Impact On Legal Profession

Posted on: February 26th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Miami Court Reporters

The digital revolution led by people like the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes includes blockchain.

The blockchain technology behind cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin has the potential to shake up the legal profession. It’s all part of a digital revolution led by pioneers like the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes.

From instruments of finance to contracts, tracking commodities, and real estate, blockchain technology has implications that go far beyond bitcoin.

According to Bloomberg:

“You don’t need to be doing initial coin offerings or issuing tokens to benefit from the blockchain,” Judith Rinearson, a partner in K&L Gates’ New York and London offices, told Bloomberg Law. Rinearson is leading an initiative at her firm that aims to eventually build an internal blockchain, which could be used in time-keeping, filing deeds, and handling merger and acquisition transactions, she said.

Blockchain—known as the technology underpinning bitcoin—allows for records of transactions to be kept on a digital ledger and shared by everyone in the network. There are multiple blockchains, and the Ethereum blockchain introduced a feature called “smart contract” that allows coded programs to act upon predefined triggers.

Blockchain technology is now being used to build tools and infrastructure that help lawyers draft contracts, record commercial transactions, and verify legal documents. Two examples of such tools and infrastructure are OpenLaw and Integra Ledger. OpenLaw allows lawyers to automatically generate legal agreements and embed smart contracts that can be executed on the blockchain. Integra Ledger provides a permissioned blockchain to increase the integrity of legal documents.

Those kinds of tools could help reduce time and money spent on mundane tasks.

It’s also part of a continuum of digital changes to the legal profession meant to introduce more efficiency and greater accuracy while driving down costs. The Miami court reporters of CourtScribes are also on that continuum.

CourtScribes delivers both a complete range of standard court reporting services as well as advanced, high value services not available from other court reporting companies. In addition to the certified transcript, CourtScribes provides live & on-demand video streaming of trial proceedings for enhanced trial team support. CourtScribes covers trials, depositions, arbitrations, mediations and hearings.

Is An Online Courtroom The Next Step In Digital Evolution Begun By People Like Miami Court Reporters CourtScribes?

Posted on: February 19th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Miami court reporters

Litigants may soon be able to go to court online, part of the wave of digital innovation pioneered by Miami court reporters agency CourtScribes.

Britain is embarking on an experiment in virtual courtrooms that could be the next step in a technological revolution begun by pioneers like Miami court reporters CourtScribes.

The Guardian reports that claimants will be able to start attending UK Tax Appeal court via video link beginning this Spring. According to the newspaper:

The new system will allow claimants to attend a hearing while at home or work, rather than having to give up a day to travel to court.

The pilot programme is part of a £1bn modernisation drive by the Ministry of Justice that is expected to expand remote hearings into other court areas. Couples applying for divorce can already conduct the process online.

Tax tribunals rule on claims about disputed assessments by HM Revenue and Customs. The hearings will involve a judge in a court taking evidence from claimants over the internet.

The software that enables the parties to communicate is free to install, according to the MoJ. If claimants wish to be represented, their lawyers can sit alongside them at their computer, or participate remotely via video link.

It’s the kind of innovation that is becoming more commonplace, thanks to digital pioneers such as the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes.

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes that CourtScribes is leading a wave of change in creating and accessing verbatim records of legal proceedings.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

Startup Uses Technology To Address Access-to-Justice Gap, As Does Court Reporting Agency

Posted on: February 12th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
court reporting agency

A startup is joining court reporting agency CourtScribes in democratizing the courts by using technology to augment professional court reporters.

A new company in Portland, Maine, hopes to use technology to close the access-to-justice gap. It’s a problem court reporting agency CourtScribes is also helping to tackle with technology.

According to Legaltech news:

Nicole Bradick, formerly the chief strategy officer at CuroLegal, has spent the last few years thinking about and developing technology for exactly this purpose. Bradick has now launched her own design and development firm, Theory and Principle, that will focus on developing legal and justice web and mobile applications.

“I saw a need for a design and development shop with a specific focus in legal tech,” Bradick told LTN of her new company. “The benefit of a niche focus is that, with each product we design and build, we gain a deeper and deeper understanding of lawyers and consumers of legal help as users of technology,” she later added.

Court reporting agency Courtscribes is well-acquainted with using technology to drive down the cost of an important legal service and ultimately opening up those services to everybody.

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes that the court reporting agency is leading a wave of change to disrupt the centuries-old court reporting profession.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

According to Unger, court reporting agencies in Florida charge as much as $10 per page for verbatim daily transcripts, while CourtScribes charges half that. “CourtScribes is able to leverage its process and technology to provide live and on-demand video or audio recording to attorneys in the office at marginal cost.”

Miami Court Reporters Make Change Work For Clients

Posted on: February 5th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Miami court reporters

The buildings may be classical, but Miami court reporters know changes are taking place in the legal system.

Miami court reporters agency CourtScribes is on the cutting edge of technology that’s changing courtrooms across the country.

The court reporting agency uses the latest in technology to help lower costs while increasing the quality of verbatim records, democratizing the legal process. It’s part of a big set of changes that’s coming to the legal system and affecting not just court reporting, but the way evidence is presented as well.

Law Technology Today, in a report about a new audio visual system in a courthouse, points out, “The jurors of today are communicating with smart phones, texting and sending e-mails.  They take pictures and videos with their phones, posting them on Facebook and YouTube, and communicate their moment-to-moment thoughts and reactions on Twitter. This new generation of jurors is accustomed to the instantaneous delivery of information using the latest technology.  As lawyers, we need to use the technology to which this group is accustomed if we expect to effectively communicate with them.”

As lawyers adjust to presenting evidence in different ways, the court reporting profession is in the middle of similar changes.

According to Jesse Caitland of essentialbusinsses.com, more technology in the courtroom has not meant job losses for court reporters, as it has for some other fields. In fact, she writes: “Court reporters have benefited in a significant way by embracing key technologies and maintaining the traditional values of professionalism, punctuality and other traits.”

Caitland points out that there’s no substitute for the judgment of a professional when it comes to such an important function as court reporting.

The Miami court reporters at CourtScribes see technology as a major opportunity. Cloud computing combined with digital and audio advances put Courtscribes ahead of the pack when it comes to both accuracy and cost. CourtScribes embrace of technology allows it to charge less and deliver more than competitors.

Miami Court Reporters CourtScribes Are On The Same Continuum As Virtual Reality

Posted on: January 29th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
virtual reality

As virtual reality explodes, it will make its way into the courtroom in a way similar to the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes.

Technology in the courtroom is getting much more powerful and the Miami court reporters at CourtScribes are at the forefront.

Technological change in the courtroom ranges from the video, audio and cloud technology used by CourtScribes to the virtual reality on the verge of more widespread use. And no doubt virtual reality will become more available, Forbes reports:

Seeing VR in the courts is set to ‘rapidly’ change in the next few years according to FBI agents and VR specialists. Not a good thing for criminals for sure but not without issue either.

The Newseum and Immersion (a VR production house) have created an interesting example – although not used in law courts – that shows the potential VR has within the legal system. The first ‘experience’ surrounds the Unabomber bombings (1975-1999). Users will be able to explore the primitive cabin where the Unabomber was captured, pick up objects and play detective, immersing themselves in scenes and scenarios that actually happened. Terry Turchie, the FBI agent who ran the task force on that case, narrates the story, which presents the user with important questions about the journalistic ethics involved in deciding whether to publish potentially controversial content.

Is this the future of criminalistics? Can VR really help convict criminals? It’s already happening according to Turchie; “The law enforcement profession is rapidly embracing virtual reality technology to enhance crime scene investigations, crime scene training, and courtroom presentations. Virtual reality technology will play an ever-evolving role, indoors and out, through the use of 3D imaging, mobile mapping, and precision use of measurements, photos and capabilities to secure and preserve crime scenes and evidence.” Currently, mass adoption is only being stopped by the cost of these systems and content per Turchie; “As the cost of using VR technology comes down, it will be widely available to police departments, small and large, to train officers and detectives in the art of crime scene investigations, from honing their observations to recording and collecting evidence.

The coming virtual reality is one thing. But the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes have been offering more accuracy for lower prices thanks to technology before now.

The company uses advances in cloud computing, audio and video technology to enhance its courtroom stenography services, building a more accurate and accessible record while bringing down costs in the process.

“CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases,” writes Barry Unger, a professor and entrepreneur, in a white paper.

South Carolina Faces Court Reporter Shortage

Posted on: January 22nd, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
Courthouse

A court reporter shortage is hitting in numerous places.

South Carolina is the latest state to face a shortage of court reporters. Shortages have been expected for some time, but companies like the Miami court reporters at CourtScribes are harnessing technology to improve the industry overall.

In South Carolina, according to the Anderson Independent, court hearings are being delayed because the state can’t hire enough court reporters.

“It’s the beginning of a disaster for the court system in South Carolina,” Valerie McFarland, president of the South Carolina Court Reporters Association, told the newspaper. “There is a problem. In South Carolina it is broken.”

South Carolina isn’t the only place facing a court reporter shortage.

A study by Ducker Worldwide predicts a shortage of court reporters in the coming year, as professionals retire without enough replacements ready to fill their shoes.

According to Ducker Worldwide: “Increased legal activity and new opportunities will drive demand despite the steady transition of some courts to digital recording. Decreased enrollment and graduation rates for court reporters, combined with significant retirement rates, will create by 2018 a critical shortfall projected to represent nearly 5,500 court reporting positions.”

CourtScribes is among the companies using technology to not only overcome the court reporter shortage, but deliver a better experience for its clients.

Cloud computing and digital audio and video advances enable Courtscribes to offer traditional services such as courtroom stenography, along with advanced services such as courtroom videography and live streaming.

Along the way, Courtscribes is riding a wave of disruption to the centuries-old court reporting profession, writes entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

Why Miami Court Reporters CourtScribes Embraces Tech Change

Posted on: January 15th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
gavel

High tech tools may someday have the prominence of the gavel, thanks to companies like the court reporters at CourtScribes.

The digital revolution is making inroads at the courthouse and companies like Miami court reporters CourtScribes are leading the way.

Those changes encompass almost every aspect of how legal work gets done, according to Reuters. According to the news agency, changes include:

The court reporting profession is seeing its fair share of change brought about by technology. And Miami court reporters CourtScribes is in the thick of things.

At CourScribes, the digital revolution has been at full boil for some time.

 

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes that the West Palm Beach court reporting agency is leading a wave of change to disrupt the centuries-old profession.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

According to Unger, court reporting agencies in Florida charge as much as $10 per page for verbatim daily transcripts, while CourtScribes charges half that. “CourtScribes is able to leverage its process and technology to provide live and on-demand video or audio recording to attorneys in the office at marginal cost. Attorneys not only benefit from a less expensive transcript but the video and/or audio recording provides them with a more accurate and complete record.

Three ways Miami court reporters CourtScribes disrupts industry

Posted on: January 8th, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
courtroom stenography

There’s still a place for courtroom stenography in the technological revolution by Miami court reporters CourtScribes.

There’s still a place for stenography in the courtroom. But the Miami court reporters of CourtScribes are changing the game by adding other services as well.

CourtScribes uses the latest technological tools to pursue the oldest goal in the business, verbatim records of key proceedings. Along the way, the Miami court reporters are driving down cost, thanks to expert use of those tools.

Here are three things CourtScribes does differently that make it an industry disruptor.

Free HD video

Thanks to the latest in video and cloud computing technology, CourtScribes is able to offer free HD video of proceedings.

Normally, videography can be even more expensive than standard services. But CourtScribes offers this service without additional cost.

Online repository

CourtScribes’ private online repository makes it possible for you to access transcripts, videos and exhibits no matter where you are and no matter what kind of device you’re using.

The company is able to do this thanks to its cloud computing prowess.

Live Streaming

For a small additional cost, CourtScribes provides live streaming of proceedings.

That service allows for enhanced trial support. “CourtScribes is able to leverage its process and technology to provide live and on-demand video or audio recording to attorneys in the office at marginal cost. Attorneys not only benefit from a less expensive transcript but the video and/or audio recording provides them with a more accurate and complete record,” Barry Unger, a professor and entrepreneur writes.

Unger points out that the company is able to do its work for less than most competitors, and is forging a new standard for court reporting.

“Looking at the already successful implementations of CourtScribes’ technology and internet based service, I can see an analogous type of phenomenon beginning to happen in the legal industry, where court reporting and videography will become a new standard, a “no-brainer” as it were, for the legal professional, and thus extend both the amount and uses of legal reporting, and its practicality and availability to a larger part of the public the legal industry serves,” he writes.

Miami court reporters lead way for 2018 trends

Posted on: January 1st, 2018 by Sfl Media No Comments
New Year

Miami court reporters CourtScribes are ready to take on 2018.

Change has swept through courtrooms for a decade. This year will be no different, and the Miami court reporters at Courtscribes are leading the way.

Courtscribes court reporters use the latest in internet, audio and video technology to go beyond courtroom stenography into a new era. And it’s leading a technological revolution at the right time, as increased demands and retirements lead to a court reporting shortage.

According to Ducker Worldwide: “Increased legal activity and new opportunities will drive demand despite the steady transition of some courts to digital recording. Decreased enrollment and graduation rates for court reporters, combined with significant retirement rates, will create by 2018 a critical shortfall projected to represent nearly 5,500 court reporting positions.”

Among the services Courtscribes is pioneering:

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

And that will continue this year and into the future.

Miami court reporter spotlight: Brooklyn courtroom leads way with new tech

Posted on: December 25th, 2017 by Sfl Media No Comments
Courtroom

Miami court reporter company Courtscribes is leading the way in tech.

Brooklyn, N.Y., recently became the latest entrant in the high-tech courtroom sweepstakes, adopting the kind of technology pioneered by Miami court reporter company Courtscribes.

Referred to as the Kings County Integrated Courtroom Technology Part, the family court features cameras, screens and audio equipment setup for video conferencing and remote court interpreting. Evidence can also be shared remotely. Wi-Fi will now all be available in all New York City Family Courts, the Brooklyn Eagle reports.

“Today is yet one more example of NYC Family Courts standing as one of the most innovative courts in our state and in the nation,” said Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence K. Marks. “Family Court is our first paperless court in the state and is probably the largest paperless court in the country. What an achievement that was and now the court will further benefit from this cutting-edge technology.”

It’s the kind of technology pioneered by Miami court reporter company Courtscribes.

Entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger, in a white paper, writes that the Fort Lauderdale court reporting agency is leading a wave of change to disrupt the centuries-old profession.

Unger writes: “CourtScribes is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as … a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases.”

Here are some of Courtscribes’ services:

Legal technology revolution expands beyond Miami court reporters to family law

Posted on: December 18th, 2017 by Sfl Media No Comments
App

An app could change family courts in the way Miami court reporters agency Courtscribes is changing record keeping.

While Miami court reporters agency Courtscribes uses technology to revolutionize record keeping, others are upending other aspects of legal proceedings.

One such offering is a new app that could help thousands of low income Floridians who can’t afford lawyers as they defend themselves in family court. The Florida Commission on Access to Civil Justice released the app last week. The app gives access to information and documents needed for divorce, seeking a protection order and other aspects of family law.

Commissioner Gregory W. Coleman said the app is designed to help those who can’t afford a lawyers. According to the Tallahassee Democrat:

A so-called justice gap, hampering millions in civil court cases is a growing problem, according to experts. One litigant does not have a lawyer in more than three-fourths of all civil trials in the United States. Last year, nearly two million people were turned away from legal aid providers due to a lack of funds, according to the Bureau of Justice.

In announcing the app’s release, Coleman said it’s needed even after the legal profession donates more than a half-billion dollars in free aid annually.

“(And) that’s just making a small dent in the 85 percent of our citizens in family law that are self-represented,” said Coleman. “There is not enough free legal work lawyers can do and there is not enough money to help them.”

As the commissioners are using technology to democratize access to family law information, Miami court reporters Courtscribes uses cloud computing and audio and video recording to democratize record keeping.

Courtscribes’ technology allows the Miami court reporters to provide more accurate records more cost efficiently than by traditional means.

Professor and entrepreneur Barry Unger writes that Courtscribes, “is changing the court reporting industry by using Internet age technology to create the official record of court proceedings, using remote transcriptionists and charging attorneys up to 50% less than what they now pay, and as argued below as a disruptive technology will not only improve the quality of services, but also ultimately extend and even democratize the use of services that are today often restricted only to high profile or high dollar value cases. The attorneys not only benefit from a less expensive transcript but the video and/or audio recording provides them with a more accurate and verifiable record.”

Court reporter shortage felt nationwide

Posted on: December 11th, 2017 by Sfl Media No Comments
Court reporters

Miami court reporters Courtscribes bring technology to the table.

A national court reporter shortage looms. But Miami court reporters company Courtscribes is pioneering technology that could help make the industry more efficient.

The court reporter shortage is happening despite the attractiveness of the profession, which includes jobs that can bring six-figure salaries. The Wall Street Journal reports:

The field, which many like to date back to ancient scribes, requires training in typing as many as 225 words a minute on a stenotype machine, a chorded keyboard used to transcribe spoken word into shorthand. Students can learn to use the machine in programs offered by trade schools and community colleges.

Depending on the industry, their experience and the amount of work they take on, court reporters can make upward of $95,000 a year. Bureau of Labor Statistics data show that the median annual pay for court reporters in 2016 was $51,320. Median pay for all high-school graduates without further education, meanwhile, has hovered around $30,000 over the past several years, according to the National Center for Education.

 At Miami court reporters company Courtscribes, the offerings go far beyond mere courtroom stenography. Its cloud, video and audio technology makes it a force to be reckoned with. The company’s process often works in the following way:
  • An experienced court reporter oversees recording equipment and takes simultaneous notes.  Digital annotations are time-linked to the recording so it’s a simple process to find and listen to actual testimony.
  • Each primary participant in the proceeding is given a discreet sound channel so that each voice is distinct, eliminating confusion caused by cross talk. “This voice isolation feature permits a full and accurate transcription of exactly what was said — and who said it — because each channel can be listened to individually,” entrepreneur and professor Barry Unger writes in a white paper.
  • Because of the quality of the recordings, court reporters are less obtrusive than in more traditional court stenography. Unger writes, “The recording process captures all words exactly as spoken — then in transcription the audio can be replayed as needed to verify verbatim accuracy.”
  • Lawyers or other interested parties can obtain copies of the digital recording as well as the transcript, and, “With digital annotations directly “hot-linked” to the audio, points of interest are located quickly and efficiently,” Unger writes.

Supreme Court takes step toward tech available to CourtScribes’ Miami court reporters

Posted on: December 4th, 2017 by Sfl Media No Comments
Supreme Court

The Supreme Court refused slowly adopts new technology

Even the U.S. Supreme Court doesn’t use the technology available through CourtScribes’ Miami court reporters. But the high court is taking steps to become more tech savvy.

The Associated Press reported in November that the Supreme Court has started making new legal filings available online. According to the news agency:

Can livestreamed audio of arguments and even televised sessions be far behind? Yes, they can.

But advocates of court openness will take what they can get for now, especially because the Supreme Court will not charge for documents. The federal courts’ PACER system does charge fees.

“Though the Supreme Court has moved glacially to join the rest of the judiciary in permitting online filing, that’s better than not at all, and the institution should be commended for creating an e-filing system that, unlike PACER, will be free and easily accessible to the public,” said Gabe Roth, executive director of Fix the Court.

Over the years, the justices have at times shown a glancing familiarity with technology. Some carry computer tablets with high court briefs loaded on them. But notes between justices are routinely sent on paper, definitely not by email.

Chief Justice John Roberts himself noted a few years back that the court stuck with pneumatic tubes to transmit newly released opinions from the courtroom to reporters waiting one floor below until 1971, long after their heyday.

Roberts said that it’s appropriate for courts “to be late to the harvest of American ingenuity” because their primary role is to resolve disputes fairly.

The Supreme Court’s position contrasts with the high tech offerings of Miami court reporters working with CourtScribes.

CourtScribes offers both complete standard court reporting services and advanced services other court reporting companies don’t have, including live, on-demand courtroom video.

“CourtScribes is embracing technology and leading the way in a new age of court reporting. They provided me with dramatically superior service and price,” says Justin Rundle of Rundle Law in Miami.

Will virtual reality become commonplace in the courtroom?

Posted on: November 27th, 2017 by Sfl Media No Comments
Virtual reality

Virtual reality could soon revolutionize the courtroom.

At CourtScribes, we’re revolutionizing court reporting and courtroom video through technology. But there’s another technology on the horizon that could profoundly affect the legal system—Virtual Reality.

Most of us think of Virtual Reality in the context of games or other entertainment. But the technology has made inroads in medicine, architecture, and, yes, law.

Bloomberg Law reports that as Virtual Reality’s costs come down, tech-savvy lawyers are examining what it can do to help their presentations and cases:

Though it can still run into six figures, the cost of virtual reality has come down and tech-savvy attorneys say the time is right for a fresh look at the technology’s use during trials, especially in areas like product liability or criminal law where evidence is vital to recreating events or presenting science.

“There are incredible possibilities for using this technology in the courtroom,” defense attorney Noel Edlin told Bloomberg Law.

Virtual reality could be used to “transport members of a jury to a Superfund site, inside a mesothelioma patient’s lungs, to the intersection where an accident occurred, or to a grisly crime scene,” said Edlin, managing partner at Bassi Edlin Huie & Blum in San Francisco.

“I believe that in 10 years, most trial lawyers will be using VR just like they’re using laptops today. VR will be the norm, not the exception,” plaintiffs’ attorney Mitch Jackson, a senior partner at Jackson & Wilson in Laguna Hills, Calif., told Bloomberg Law.

In another article, though, Bloomberg Law reports that there are still hurdles to clear before we see virtual reality headsets in everyday courtrooms. Among those:

Topping the list, three-dimensional graphical presentations with interactivity seem so real to jurors that they may prove unduly persuasive in a legal process built around discerning truth. And people can react very differently to the technology.

Some jurors may lose attention while others may even get motion sick.

Those obstacles may be surmounted by excluding jurors prone to illness and physical stress; and experts can serve as courtroom “tour guides” to keep jurors from losing focus.

Still, virtual reality is definitely a technology to be on the lookout for.